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Pacific Rim Sourcebook
Publisher: R. Talsorian Games Inc.
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 01/13/2019 13:46:29

A brief introduction 'for gamers' sets out the way this book has been approached, in the main it's written as a travel journal, the sort of thing you might consult if intending to go there, with game stuff - plot ideas, mechanics, etc - confined to sidebars and separate sections. The idea is that the material here should empower you to run adventures in the Pacific Rim - the far east of China, Japan, etc., Indochina, Indonesia, the Philippines, or right down to Australia and New Zealand - or have characters who come from there, wherever it is that they are now adventuring.

Then we get the travel magazine introduction, all delivered in character and explaining some of the basics like how names work in different nations and what currencies are used and how much your Eurobucks are worth. There are also notes on how similar cultures are to one another and about driving - and about the ease (or otherwise) of using cyberweapons when driving on what, to you, is the 'wrong' side of the road!

We then dive straight into the Japan section, starting with a map and some background and culture. Despite being renowed for corporations, it is still an Empire. It's also one of the biggest consumers of cyberwear. Due to a period of assassinations in the early years of the 21st century, the throne is now occupied by a 13-year-old girl, with a regent in place and - due to family connections - Arasaka troops supplementing the Imperial Guard. There's a timeline from 1992 to the present (2020), and notes on religion (Shinto, respect for the dead, especially dead heroes) and how the country got its name. Urban attitudes, recent political history and current affairs, and how corporations and government work together... and we meet some of the leading corporations. There is material on the Self Defence Force (SDF) - technically Japan doesn't have armed forces - including all the details necessary to make a character who has served, or is serving, in the SDF. Then we hear about Japanese police and the draconian weapons laws, along with notes for creating cop NPCs, before moving on to Japanese gang culture. Then there's a more in-depth look at Tokyo. Apparently a major bridge has gone rogue. It's controlled by an AI, you see, and that has developed a wayward streak that hasn't been brought back under control - it uses drones and point-defence systems to keep those it doesn't like away! There are brief notes on Osaka and Kyoto as well; and the section ends with how different roles fare in Japan, and a whole bunch of atmospheric LifePath material for Japanese-born characters.

The next chapter deals with United Korea. Well, the rest of the world may be going to hell in a handcart, but unlike the real world, North and South Korea have reunited. Tensions remain in a land where cybertech is frowned upon, a very male-dominated society where women are treated as chattels and breeding stock - of course, many of them disagree with this role and are doing something about it. A lot of this is explained in a fascinating 'interview' with Mrs Sun UnSuk, the head of Sungan Zaibatsu, which explains a lot of Korean culture and mindset. There's also a timeline, and even a character sheet for Sun UnSuk in case she pops up in one of your adventures. There's a detailed look at Seoul, the capital and home to ten million people, and notes on leading Zaibatsus, the Korean answer to corporations. An outline of the political situation presents a place dominated by corruption and nepotism despite ostensibly being a presidential parliamentary democracy. Focus then moves to the Korean military and law enforcement. As all Koreans do military service when young, it's likely that any Korean character will have served and a few notes cover this. The police are actually military in nature, and virtually incorruptable. Details of making a Military Police character are also included.

Next up is China, with a timeline and notes on the confusing class system within a classless society. Anyone who is not Chinese will stand out like a sore thumb, and anyone who is of Chinese heritage will be expected to speak the language. The importance of maintaining 'face', avoiding the number four and mutual gift-giving (which you don't accept at first offering so as not to appear greedy) are also covered. Get some business cards with your name and a flowery description of your profession in both English and Chinese. Most people are very superstitious. Main forms of transport are trains, bicyles and feet. It's still Communist, and very beaurocratic, so dealing with the government is frustratingly slow and difficult. It's a police state, and you need official permission to do just about anything. Few people have access to weapons or cyberwear. They still use the Yuan as currency, with paper notes rather than credchips... and the black market is huge. Everybody uses it at least occasionally. There's some history - quite a brief overview given how long China's history is! - and notes on the various gangs to watch out for and avoid. The main organised crime gangs as the Triads. Geography is covered sketchily in a series of thumbnail sketches, given that China is such a big country. Beijung, Shanghai and Hong King are described in a little more detail. Civil war has done a lot of damage wherever you go, although everything is peaceful now. Interestingly, after the British left Hong Kong the Ghurkas developed into an independent mercenary group. There's a fair bit about the Chinese military and Public Security (that's the police). And Taiwan? Still independent, capitalist to the hilt, beaurocratic, armed to the teeth. No change there. Finally there's a round-up of how different roles operate in China along with revised Lifepaths if you fancy playing one.

The next port of call (several, really) is Southeast Asia. This covers Indochina, the Philippines, Malaysia and all the islands between the Asian mainland and Australia. The timeline mostly talks about how world events affected the nations here, although the Philippines appear to have gone through presidents like nobody's business - one was killed and his successor was also sent to meet his Maker on the way to his inauguration! Ancient nations, yet ones long accustomed to dealing with Europeans since colonial days, they have their own trading bloc which remains just that, unlike the European Community, whom they distrust. They also keep wary eyes on China and Japan. It's hot and humid most of the time, with a rainy season and a tendency to typhoons. Cultures differ by island, but tend to be Chinese or Malay based, then there's an added layer of faith - Buddhist or Islamic. Since the Mid-East Meltdown, there's been an influx of Muslims from the Middle East. Most nations, however, don't like the generally scruffy cyberpunk style so visitors are warned to be careful about their appearance. Singapore even has dress codes enshrined in legislation! Many nations have internal unrest, and all who rely on fishing or tourist beaches have been blighted by a massive oil spill. There's a survey of the different nations to highlight various salient points, an overview and notes on economy and government. Everythings scattered with commentary from various individuals, information on notable individuals, and often a few words of local slang. Again, the section ends with notes on how the various roles play out in the area, and Lifepath notes.

Then we come to Australasia, consisting of Australia and New Zealand. Australia became a federal republic in 2001 after the fall of the UK monarchy. Western Australia promptly left the Federation, but the rest of Australia refused to recognise this. They are sports fanatics, preferring Australian Rules Football (usually called footy) in which cyberwear is forbidden. There is a cyberware variant league however. Beer is also vital to Australian culture, and they are not interested in substitutes or even foreign 'real' beers. Australia used to be a textbook for racial/cultural integration, at least of immigrants. The aboriginals would disagree. Poverty since 1994 has divided the country often on racial lines. There's a survey across the states, complete with several overt adventure hooks, and after some Aussie slang, New Zealand gets the same treatment. Then there's the usual role-specific information and Lifepath modifications.

Finally, there's a chapter on Martial Arts. Most of the Asian nations have their own distinctive styles, and there are descriptions along with modifications to the rules in the shape of Friday Night Fist Fight! Different styles are described, along with distinctive martial arts weapons. There's a lot here, but if you want a martial arts brawl in your game, now you can have a spectacular one! There are also notes on new skills and new roles, some of which have been mentioned earlier but which are now expanded into useable rules. Want to be a spy or a pirate? Now you can...

There's a lot packed in here but if you want to take your adventures to this region or have a character come from there, it will prove invaluable.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Pacific Rim Sourcebook
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Listen Up You Primitive Screwheads!!!!!
Publisher: R. Talsorian Games Inc.
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 01/09/2019 13:10:20

Subtitled "The Unexpurgated Cyberpunk Referee's Guide", this is a rather chatty guide through the art and science of running your Cyberpunk game. However many rules there are in the core rulebook and supplements, as soon as the game actually starts to interact with players, questions arise. Can you do this thing? And if so, how does it work? Yet role-playing games by their very nature are not rules-bound. If there isn't a rule for a thing, make it up. If you don't care for the rule that is there for that thing, discard it and substitute your own. It's not a sporting contest where the rules are set in stone and known by all participants. This is role-playing, and the whole point is to have fun.

There's a whole bunch of material here, including running long-term campaigns, the whole style and atmosphere you're trying to create, maintaining control of a game with 'power players' in it, the sociology of cyberpunk, fleshing out the lifepath, working in fringe characters, whether running games set on the street or in a skyscraper (i.e. at a corporate level) are best suited to you, and winding up with Mike Pondsmith's collection of dirty tricks and some actual new rules. Quite a lot to feed your inner Referee on!

We start off with a piece about getting the party together in the first place. What is going to make them bond into a team rather than a bunch of chance associates? Some novel ideas including having them all by chance be somewhere that comes under attack and only by working together will they survive long enough to take vengeance on the attackers. Or you can manipulate the Lifepath so that they have a common background event or other link. Or they all have rooms in the same building. The possibilies are endless. Sneaky referees will make Lifepath event rolls for their players, telling them the outcome with or without reference to the actual tables. You also may have a campaign goal in end, so you'll need to work out how this motley band are going to get there. This is followed by a piece on creating successful plots, especially where there is no readily-identifiable 'bad guy'. Lots of good advice here. Next is a piece on how a Cyberpunk is not, and should not, be run on the same lines as, say, a game of Dungeons & Dragons. There's also a lot of good advice about creating a plot arc appropriate for Cyberpunk which makes excellent reading. Interestingly, as is the case throughout the book, each section is written by a different author, so there is a refreshing diversity of opinions. Read through, decide what you want to use, discard anything you don't, very much in the spirit of the entire supplement.

Next is a selection of articles around the Cyberpunk Milieu: Style and Atmosphere. Core, says the first one, is the tech. Most people - players, referees and indeed characters - won't really understand it, they just know what it can do for them. Here there's an attempt to present some of the overarching tech themes and show how they can work in your game... and what the drawbacks are. Like if you have skinweave, don't lose or gain weight dramatically, 'cos your skinweave will not change size along with you! The next article gets to the essence of the genre: style over substance. It's a world-feel, and within this world we run our adventures. But if they are not firmly rooted in this world, they are not Cyberpunk they are merely action-adventure with a bit of future-tech spin. There's a second article here on the same lnes, with ideas for mining different areas of literature to create your edgy, gadget-obsessed world. Remember, even in 2020, cyberpunk is a subculture. Not everyone lives that way even though the characters do. High tech, attitude, looking cool whatever you're doing, this is what makes the setting work.

This is followed by a chapter on Gun Control and the Power Player Problem. This reminds me of teacher training, 'cos it talks about establishing control over the game without abusing your power. Be subtle about the tools you use. The law and the cost of whatever the party wants are good ones. Someone who insists on lots of armour and open-carry of field-grade weapons is likely to find a MAX-TAC squad waiting for them. If you need something quick, or illegal, it's going to cost more (and then some, if it's both!). Yet if you don't look good, reactions are going to be negative, so you have to invest in what's stylish right now. And that's expensive. Encouirage role-play and modify tasks accordingly. What about problem players (as opposed to their characters)? You can make life difficult for their characters, but be inventive about it. If they are power-playing, think of it as using good role-playing to correct their poor role-playing, that's all. There's a bit of a discussion about various levels of tech from completely ubiquitous to world-changing and how to handle them well... and control it when necessary. Then there's a piece about power-players and how to deal with them, starting with the concept that a power-player is more of a war-gamer seeking a win than a role-player looking for a shared alternate reality, and that they see the referee as an opponent rather than a guide to that reality. This doesn't mean someone who can think tactically in a fight scene, many players have military experience or wargame and use that knowledge when it is appropriate to do so. Several examples of power play are given with examples of how to steer them into being useful, stop them messing up the game or completely neutralising what they are trying to do. Useful examples of player-handling that should improve your game mastery irrespective of what system you are running. There are also ways of using tech against characters who use that to power-play. Another voice provides a second spin on these concepts, mostly looking at how to stop game-breaking schemes by your players (without just saying NO, it's more entertaining than that!)... some real nasty tricks here. And who says you'll keep them for power-players. Many will work well in the game anyway. The opposition ought to be playing hardball.

Then comes Cyberpunk Sociology. This is an essay on the underlying philosphy of the game by Mike Pondsmith himself. He defines what he means by cyberpunk. It's about hard choices, emerging technologies, about how information is used and abused, and about rebellion. Get those straight, and you too will be cyberpunk. A few other voices then chip in with their opinions. Things like the place of honour, about never being alone... things to think about, about a troubled world. It's fascinating to read this in 2019 and decide if this world is worse off or better off than the real one.

Next there's a chapter on Running Combat in Cyberpunk. This looks at fights as an integral part of the game, at putting the correct spin on your brawls - rather than a review of the rules, although it does talk about how to use them creatively... and some hints and tips to make the referee's life easier during combat. There are also some sound combat tactics that you may not know, especially if you don't happen to have a military background at the elite forces level - something that applies to most of us. Interestingly, it also covers providing quiet advice to players whose characters know a lot more about combat than they do!

Then there's a chapter on Fleshing out the Lifepath... how to make it an integral part of the game you are playing, not just the character's backstory that ended once play began. This chapter, from Pondsmith again, draws on material devised for Cybergeneration and retrofits it to the parent game to excellent effect. There's a lot crammed into a few pages that can make role-playing ramp up amazingly. You may want to retool it for other games too, it's that good. And it also shows how to go beyond mere mechanical tools when you or a player has a good idea not contained within the tables. Make it happen!

The next chapter Working in the Fringe Characters rather puzzles me. It talks about some character roles as if they were peripheral, and how to weave them into your game. Rockers, Techies, Medtechies, and Netrunners are taken as examples... heck, in my games they already have a part to play! To be fair there are some good ideas to mine here. Of particular use to the fair fre referees who ban Netrunners because they find them too hard to manage properly. Other contributions run through all the roles, showing how they all have a part to play. There's also material to help you cope with a character concept that doesn't fall neatly into one of the standard roles. It ends with ways to use existing roles in unusual ways... and how to winkle the netrunner out into the field. Unfortunately, I think my referees have all read this bit!

Then there's a look at Cyberpunk Campaigns: Street or Skyscraper? The idea is most games revolve about cybered-up mercenaries doing dangerous jobs... and that can be great fun. If you are getting bored with that, though, there are ways to breathe fresh life into your game. Things you might want to try anyway to stretch the players. There are some excellent ideas for novel campaigns here.

Finally, we get Down and Dirty with Mike Pondsmith. Mind blown. Plenty here to make your players sit up and notice. Finally there's a chapter of New Rules. This includes a variant combat system called High Noon Shootout, and a section on explosives. Oh, and how to run a good bar fight or other slugging match. Just because almost everyone's packing they don't HAVE to start shooting. A good punch-up is sometimes more appropriate. This includes some new martial arts styles.

This is one of the most interesting 'Referee Advice' books that I've read. While much is tied into the setting, understanding what's here will make you a better game master whatever you run. Listen up, you primitive screwheads, you need to get hold of this. Just keep it away from your players!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Listen Up You Primitive Screwheads!!!!!
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Rough Guide to the UK
Publisher: R. Talsorian Games Inc.
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 01/07/2019 10:18:24

Essential reading aimed at 'punks contemplating visiting the UK, much of it is written 'in character', and it makes some grim reading. Apparently, the UK has been under martial rule for some time, but this has just been overthrown and the monarchy restored. The downfall began in 2016 when the Scots rebelled, and more and more service personnel diserted on the grounds they hadn't signed up to oppress their fellow countrymen. The Introduction covers these recent events in considerable detail - apparently despite the restoration of the monarchy, the rest of government hasn't got sorted out yet. Now they are bickering on how Parliament is to be elected. The new monarch is Queen Victoria II, who is actually identified as Princess Beatrice, the elder daughter of Prince Andrew (who, like most of the Royals had been murdered in the early stages of the establishment of martial rule... which is inaccurately referred to as 'martial law' throughout). Her mother, Sarah Duchess of York, had fled to America with both her daughters in an attempt to escape. These are real people, by the way, if you don't happen to know the British Royal Family.

This initial recent history explained, the next chapter deals with Politics and Government, which as mentioned is still in a state of flux. The restoration was engineered by a cartel of corporations, but the new Queen is showing some distressing signs of independence from them. The country is divided into sixteen adminstrative districts (a hangover from martial rule), and travel between them is restricted although it's not hard to bypass the checks if you really want to. It appears that dire as the state of the UK is, in this reality they have remained in the European Union, and are taking great advantage of this status.

We also meet two corporations - Imperial Metropolitan Agriculture (IMA), who took full advantage of martial rule to enrich themselves, and the Hillyard Corporation (which was involved in the restoration). There are quite a few others, including a reimagined English Tourist Board (ETB) that has got rather big for its boots. There's a long description of taking an ETB tour that somewhat reminds me of touring China in the 1980s. This chapter includes a section on law and order with crimes and punishments listed. The UK still maintains an anti-gun stance, at least as far as private ownership goes, and also views cyber-crime in a dim light. Police, courts and prisons are also covered here. Needless to say, in an oppressed country, organised crime and gangs have flourished, they too are described in this chapter. Apparently 'soccer violence' - which was a problem in the 1980s but has been sorted out in the real world - is also still a problem in this alternate reality, and has been joined by 'youth culture violence'. The Armed Forces are also discussed, with sufficient information for the generation of military characters if so wished. Finally, weapons and equipment are detailed for all the gun-bunnies to drool over.

This makes for a very long chapter, it could perhaps have been broken up a bit more. The next chapter is The Nomadic Movement. As you can imagine, the 'travellers' and other non-conventional peoples did not get on well with martial rule, and it took a lot of campaigning and direct action (read: terrorism) to gain concessions to live life as they pleased. Now the fight is on to retain those concessions under the new regime. There's discussion of paganism and some of their leading personalities, as well as descriptions of the main 'tribes' involved... which include biker gangs and highwaymen as well as more conventional travelling communities.

Next up, The Media. As you can imagine, the press was censored heavily during martial rule and they are now struggling to regain the cherished freedom of the press that they used to enjoy. Of course, the likes of pirate broadcasting flourished, albeit influenced by whatever corporation funded them, under martial law. There is still censorship in operation at the present. There are three newspapers (apparently British people still like reading their news off a paper copy!), and the BBC is still around, having become the mouthpiece of the miliary rulers. A sample day's programming is provided, this could make good flavour for your game. There are also 'independent' TV stations. There's a section on working in the media along with some notable personalities that might be encountered or at least seen on the screen.

This is followed by The UK: A Visitor's Guide. This covers travel, geography, food and drink, music and the arts, and a wealth of local information. Bears and wolves can be found in remote forests once again, indeed outside of intensively farmed areas, Britain's countryside has quite a mediaeval appearance. The food and drink section is quite entertaining, there's a list of recently-released albums and a section of slang, as well as some discussion of sport. There are two NFL franchises and a semi-pro league for those who prefer their football grid-iron, but for most in Britain, 'football' means 'soccer' and that is the main spectator sport. Then we move on to descriptions of the sprawling conurbations where the majority of people live.

Finally, England: A Regional Guide provides a pretty comprehensive gazetteer. This includes places to visit, notable locals and notes on what to watch out for and be wary of. There are rumours, too, and useful local contacts. North Wales has apparently gobbled up my house in Crewe, which was in England last time I looked! Apprently it's a quiet town with a club called Beechings... an in joke, as its the railway hub for the entire country, and a 1960s politician called Beeching tried to close many railway lines! Yes, despite being called England: A Regional Guide, this section covers Wales and Scotland too.

This is a magnificent exposition of a Britain that isn't, with enough ideas for Britain-based adventures to run an entire campaign... even if these ideas are ones that spawn as you read the text, rather than are explicitly mentioned. The one thing that isn't mentioned is exactly why the UK ended up under martial law. There's a vague reference to an army coup in 2001, but no indication what prompted it. Still with the oppressive nature of that period graphically described, perhaps its origins have been lost to the historical record. A thoroughly entertaining read, and a good place to send your 'punks to seek adventure.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Rough Guide to the UK
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0one's Blueprints: The Citadel
Publisher: 0one Games
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 01/06/2019 12:29:44

Billed as a 'small' citadel, I think it's actually quite a spacious one, suitable for whatever political intrigues or bloody insurrections you may have in mind. The introductory material covers the customisation possible (showing or hiding fill, numbers, grid, and furniture) and presents a legend for map symbols - and also suggests that the grid be taken as 20' squares as the place is large! There are also some ideas for how the citadel can feature in your game. This might be the centre of a larger town, or a stand-alone and self-sufficient outpost. It's on a river (or sea shore) with a dock, as well as stables, a forge, inns, and other necessities.

The first plan shows ground level, the second shows the upper level, and the third the rooftops (perfect for parkour...). There are two further plans, one showing the caverns underneath, part of which has been altered to form a dungeon complete with cells, the other presents a sewer system.

There are well over an hundred rooms to play with. The temple is massive, either whoever rules here is quite fanatical about their deity or maybe this is the base of a religious rather than secular power. Although the introduction talks about stables, a forge, and drinking establishments, most of the chambers are able to be assigned as you wish - there are some obvious stables with rows of stalls.

The main courtyard boasts a massive structure which could be a flamboyant podium or memorial of some kind. Maybe this is where whoever is in charge holds audience, on dry days! There's accommodation, a cloister, halls, two entrances, and a smaller courtyard that has a gated entrance to the larger main one.

There's a lot to play with here. Have fun designing the centre of power for a faith or an area of your campaign world - or have even more fun gifting it to your party when they reach a resonable level or pull off an amazing feat that deserves reward, and watch them making it over as they wish (and then, of course, invade!). It's an unusual edifice, yet one replete with potential to do something quite unique!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
0one's Blueprints: The Citadel
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0one's Blueprints: Vampire Castle
Publisher: 0one Games
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 01/05/2019 12:35:44

The vampire lurking in a remote and ancient castle lair is a standard image in the horror genre, so here are the tools to recreate it (you don't even need to be playing Dungeons & Dragons to find a use for these plans!). Of course it may not be a vampire who lives here at all, maybe it's the family seat of an ancient bloodline whose history is entwined with that of the lands around, or it may have been abandoned or repurposed for another use entirely - a grand hotel with hidden secrets, perhaps - or maybe your own party has been gifted the place by a grateful monarch... but you have to make it your own! The possibilities are endless.

The introductory notes offer some ideas for why the party might pay a call here, as well as providing a legend for map symbols and instructions on using the customisation tools that switch fill, numbers, grid, and furniture on and off.

The first plan gives an overview of the entire castle, with a gatehouse and curtain wall around the central structure. Perched on a hilltop with a chasm between the main castle and the entranceway, unless you are good at climbing (or can fly) it is quite difficult to gain access.

The second plan presents the entrance in more detail. There are 2 small structures on the far side of the chasm, a drawbridge, then a small complex of chambers in the outer wall with a wide passageway leading further in. This page also depicts the 'overlook' - a balcony on the far side that looks out over the lands beyond. Relatively safe from attack, this is an open area with several rooms and a terrace.

We then move on to an exploration of the main structure, beginning with the basement or Level -1. Down here there's a veritable maze of very small rooms, probably cells, and a lot of statues. This is followed by a plan of Level 0, which has several large rooms, including a hall that contains a massive statue, and shows the base of several towers. Level 1 shows that the hall with the massive statue is two stories high and also includes what appears to be a throne room.

Next, Level 2 provides the roof to some areas (including the large hall which has a dome over it) and includes high walkways to the surrounding curtain wall, including two which extend to the 'overlook' spoken about earlier. Level 3, Level 4 and Level 5 are mainly rooftops apart from some towers that continue upwards, their top levels - open to the sky - appear on Level 6. Within the castle there are many rooms, most of which have been left empty and unadorned, you will be able to have fun deciding what is there.

This is a quite magnificent castle, worthy of some great ruler or historied family. It's wasted on a vampire... if one's there, it is time to throw him out and install a more worthy resident!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
0one's Blueprints: Vampire Castle
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Tales from the Forlorn Hope
Publisher: R. Talsorian Games Inc.
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 01/05/2019 09:38:17

Although this is a collection of eight ready-to-run adventures, this book is a bit more than that. Whatever backgrounds your party has, it's assumed they like to hang out at a bar called The Forlorn Hope, which is owned and operated by veterans of the Central American Wars. They have gravitated to the life of a Solo, and it's a good place for rumours and job opportunities for anyone able to prove their worth in the shady world of the cyberpunk. Your party probably fits right in.

To that end, the book opens with extensive details of the Forlorn Hope itself, and a whole bunch of NPCs found there. Most of it (apart from game mechanical bits) is presented as an article about the place: you might even want to share that with your players. There are even interviews with the NPCs that help bring them to life. Floorplans and notes on setting up your game - this is intended for fairly new if not beginning characters, but you might have a more experienced party so there are notes on how to accommodate them - are also provided.

It's not all 'local colour', though. Now for the neat bit. Each adventure is linked to at least one of the NPCs. This helps the party develop a feeling of investment, the fellow at the centre of whatever's going on right now is someone they drink with regularly. The adventures are designed to be run in a single session, but of course could be expanded on if you wish. Reading the first adventure - Agency Job - it all sounds very familiar: I think I played it many years ago. It involves raiding a consulate to get information on some foreign government's clandestine activities, and then putting paid to them by sinking a boat that's pivotal to their operations. When I played it we attacked by swimming underwater, and my character enjoyed it so much she kept the skill chips and SCUBA equipment in lieu of her fee!

Other adventures follow thick and fast. Each comes with ideas for both expanding the actual scenario and for follow-up adventures. There's A Hard Road to Go, which takes the party on a simple convoy escort job (yeah, right!). The Impalers involves a trip to Europe to find one of the regulars' missing brother. Girls' Night Out is an extraction mission. Colombian Cookout is a mercenary mission in South America (but there's scope for non-combat-oriented characters as well). Fall of the Axeman is a detective job, the party needs to find out who killed one of the Forlorn Hope regulars, and why. Street smarts and a spot of netrunning will come in useful for this one, but there's brawling as well. Tough as Nails involves helping a Federal Marshal clear a friend's name in a battle against corruption in law enforcement, and finally The Last Long Rider sends the party after a cyberpsychotic veteran. Each adventure is packed with detail, maps, believable NPCs, and more.

This gets to the core of Cyberpunk. Characters living in a gig economy, picking up dangerous jobs where they can, and living a life that's fast and exciting... but perhaps not very long. A good way to get started, especially if you don't have a grand campaign arc in mind right away.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Tales from the Forlorn Hope
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0one's Blueprints: Halls of Giants
Publisher: 0one Games
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 01/04/2019 11:26:59

The idea here is that there is a multi-level underground complex that was built for and inhabited by (or at least was at some time) by giants. There's a ruined keep outside, near the entrance - was that a guardpost to protect them or was it designed to keep them in? There are plenty of things you'll have to decide, although a few ideas (one garbled beyond recognition) are provided in the introductory section, along with information on how to customise the plans (you can choose whether or not to have the heavy fill, grid, numbers or furniture displayed) and a legend for common items that may be found in the plans. It's common to all of 0one's sets of plans so not everything may show up!

The first plan is the ruined keep. Much of the walls are missing, and there isn't much aside from debris within. Even the bridge across the stream running outside looks pretty battered. It's not very clear where the entrance to the underground complex is - look for the number 1 in what appears to be a slight curve in the hillside overlooking the keep, that's where it is supposed to be.

Next is level 1 of the complex proper. It's apparently the domain of guards and warriors, but also boasts a couple of temples. Even they might want to worship after all. There are storerooms and bedrooms. The temples have pillared halls and statues, one is larger than the other. Perhaps two deities of differing important to the residents, or one is a shrine to drop in for a quick prayer and the other the location of formal worship. The way down is to be found down a corridor of storerooms and barracks, not a very smart entrance. There's another way down too, if you can find the secret door to access it!

The next plan is level 2. This is where the chieftain dwell. There's also a shrine, a forge, and several cells, as well as a kitchen and refectory and space to meet. There are storerooms and living quarters for a handful of the senior leadership as well.

Level 3 follows. This is a mining complex, built around a great rift that has been bridged in quite dramatic style. Probably not quite enough space for Gandalf to battle balrogs, but that kind of thing. There are storerooms, a couple more shrines and several crypts down here as well. The final plan depicts Level 4, which is under development, with mineshafts all around the central rift.

This all makes for an interesting complex - a somewhat militarised mining outpost, it doesn't seem to be a 'home' - but it doesn't screech 'giant'. You'll need to be creative about describing these great hallways... or maybe decide it's a 10' or even 15' grid, rather than the assumed 5' one (a scale is never mentioned, so you will be able to get away with that!). There's scope for fun exploring the place, whether it's a working mine with giants working away or an abandoned one which may or may not have attracted other residents.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
0one's Blueprints: Halls of Giants
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0one's Blueprints: The Lost City
Publisher: 0one Games
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 01/03/2019 10:27:55

Finding a lost city can ensure your name goes down in history or even provide you with fabulous wealth... or your death! It can certainly be an adventure. So here is one, ready to explore. The introductory notes explain how the customisation tools work, enabling you to decide whether or not you wish to display heavy fill, a grid, numbers, or the furiture and other set dressing supplied. It's reasonably flexible and handled neatly. There also are some ideas about what's going on here that might have drawn your party to explore...

The first plan is an overview of the city as a whole. There's a large walled complex with a couple of gates that contains a massive pyramid and other structures (the introduction suggests these are temples) and there are many smaller structures outside the walls. There is also an entrance to the city which looks like a river dock... this could prove interesting if, as is suggested, you situate the lost city in the middle of a desert, half buried in sand!

Next up is one of the structures from the main compound, which is tagged as the Hall of Heroes. This has a long pillared hallway with statues in niches, and another area down a long corridor that has more statues standing as if on guard outside a series of small rooms. It's a bit unclear where this is on the overview map, but if you take the entrance to the Hall of Heroes to be the entrance through the walls into the compound it begins to make a little more sense. Perhaps everyone entering the compound is obliged to pass through here in respect to those heroes who have gone before.

These are followed by a couple of temples - which if the 'fill' is to be believed are carved out of solid rock! Each consists of a pillared worship area with at least one statue. Next is a page showing another small temple and what are described as a series of crypts - long passageways with lots of tiny rooms. Then there comes a plan labelled 'Main Crypt (Pyramid)' - think of the internal structure of the Great Pyramid at Giza and you get the idea, one major tomb down a long flight of steps.

In an attempt to make things clear, the final plan is a side elevation/cross-section showing how the main crypt is positioned within the pyramid. You are then provided with a few pages on which to make your own notes.

The central burial complex is covered quite well, but the rest of the city has been rather neglected. What are all the other buildings? Where did people live? Or did they only come here to bury - and perhaps even worship - their dead? Have fun coming up with answers to these questions! These plans will do nicely for more modern games as well when you need a complex of this kind for the party to explore.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
0one's Blueprints: The Lost City
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0one's Blueprints: Fishermen's Village
Publisher: 0one Games
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 01/02/2019 13:06:04

You never know when a small seaside village will be needed. The intoductory notes contain a few adventure possibilities from vanishing locals to sea monsters or the place being taken over by pirates (and one suggestion about seafood that has got garbled!), but I'm sure you can come up with more. This section also explains the customisation possible, a series of checkboxes that allow you to turn on and off the grid, eliminate the room numbers, get the walls filled and either show or not show the doors and furniture. There is also a generic legend explaining symbols used.

So, on to the first plan, being an overview of the village with a small cluster of buildings around the harbour made secure by a long breakwater. There are quite a few boats moored up, it seems that the fishermen are at home...

We then spin through more detailed interior plans for a shipyard, tavern, temple and warehouses... it's a bit difficult to locate them on the overview map but if you look at the mostly blank notes pages at the back, they have been given numbers that relate to the overview map. So that's sorted!

The shipyard is a two-storey building, the workshops occupying the ground floor with living quarters and office space above. The main workshop opens onto a slipway and there's room inside to build a fishing boat of the size shown in the harbour. There's a big store room as well.

The tavern is equipped with plenty of tables and chairs/benches and a bar in a single tap room, with a kitchen behind, and barrel storage in a cellar below. There is an upper floor with several rooms that can be used for private meetings or living space, plus the owner's bedroom.

The 'sea temple' has the usual sort of religious trappings, a big statue at one end and others along the side walls with living quarters for the priest in back and stairs down to an underground level boasting yet more statues and a pool. It shouldn't prove too difficult to come up with appropriate worship rituals for whichever god you decide to have revered here. My go-to sea deity is called Psglod, by the way, it's one I made up. Priests wear blue-green robes with white trim and this is the patron deity of fishermen and other merchant seamen.

Finally the warehouse has a series of chambers that can be used to store all manner of nautical bits and bobs. The illustrations suggest lots of barrels, fish and some spare boats. There is an upper level with sleeping accommodation, an office and a meeting room - perhaps this belongs to the harbour master or the chief of the fishing fleet.

What's there is excellent... but there are far more boats than there is living quarters for their sailors (and these appear to be day boats, not live-aboards). Even the two or three buildings on the overview plan that are not detailed further would have to be jam-packed with bunk beds to accommodate them all. Add some housing for the fishermen and you have a great little village on your hands.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
0one's Blueprints: Fishermen's Village
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0one's Blueprints: City of the Dead
Publisher: 0one Games
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 01/01/2019 11:43:47

Cemeteries can be fascinating places to visit - you may be chasing cultists, smacking down undead, or gloating over an enemy's demise (and maybe even dancing on his grave!). Or perhaps you are a necromancer in search of more supplies. Whatever reason you have for sending the party to a graveyard, here's a good one to send them to.

The introductory notes explain the limited customisation that's possible. You can switch on or off the heavy background 'fill' (for ink-saving purposes), you can also remove or display a grid, the furniture depicted, or numbers. Play around, see what you like best. There's also a few ideas about how you could use this set of plans, and a generic key - a lot of which isn't relevant here, it's the standard one that appears in all sets of 0one plans.

The first plan shows the entire cemetery, which is a quite large walled one on a slight hill. It's probably located outside a city, but sometimes you'll find it within city limits - especially if the city has grown rapidly of late. There's a path up to the single gate, and several trees grow amongst the gravestones and monuments. It gives a good impression of the whole, with regular grave plots as well as some larger monuments.

Next up is a cross-section of the entire hill showing how there are catacombs underneath one mausoleum, and how the ground slopes slightly across the entire cemetery. This is followed by more detailed plans of the mausoleum and the underground level. Statues, pillars and places for multiple burials suggest that an important family owns this tomb. Of course, you can abstract this plan and add it to the grounds of some notable family's home, if preferred!

Next up, plans of the mortuary, which also has an underground level. There's an office, a workshop and storage; clearly this is used for an undertaking business as well as the base for running the cemetery. There's a nice central courtyard with trees and a collonade, and what might be a viewing area downstairs for those who wish to see their deceased loved ones one last time before they are buried.

The following page presents plans for two other mausoleums. One is round and the other is square, but both pack in quite a few tombs. They both have an underground level as well as what can be seen above ground. Finally there are the plans for the actual catacombs, which are also beneath the large mausoleum that was shown first. This boasts several statures as well as loads of burial niches, and an entire section hidden behind secret doors.

Overall, it makes for a lot of scope for some shenanigans in a graveyard - not necessarily limited to a fantasy game, of course. It's certainly a resource worth having up your sleeve.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
0one's Blueprints: City of the Dead
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0one's Blueprints: Drow Outpost
Publisher: 0one Games
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 12/31/2018 07:44:47

This set of plans depicts a well-constructed subterranean fortress that guards a tunnel. It's a tough nut to crack, but the daring may be able to conquer it, despite it being a comprehensive establishment well-suited to its role and to long-term habitation by its Drow defenders... of course, even if it was built by Drow, you may decide that they have moved out and been replaced by other forces, or even opportunists! The introductory notes provide several ideas for adventures using the outpost, but there's plenty of scope for your own adventures...

The fortress has several levels, described as 0, 1, 2, and -1 (this last being in the shape of a spider and which would make a good temple to Lolth. Being subterranean, there is no 'ground level' as such, although for internal logic level 0 probably can be considered so - it is the first level presented and has a front door! And a back one, for that matter.

The first plan, Level 0, provides for an open approach guarded by two towers between which there is a solid wall, all well-furnished with arrow slits. Behind this imposing facade there is an open courtyard which, if this fortress were outside, would be open to the sky, Beyond this is another wall (and more arrow slits) while to either side there's a series of storage rooms, barracks and a mess hall. The kitchen appears to be in a corner of the mess hall. Can you but find the secret doors, there is a passageway from the open approach to the storerooms on one side, bypassing the defences. Otherwise the route through the fortress leads through a couple of halls, the second lined with pillars, to a set of double doors that open to the area beyond. This side does not have arrow-slits.

The second plan depicts Level 1. There are numerous smallish rooms, the continuation of the towers and a gallery over the open area in Level 0. Of note is a large pillared hall with the depiction of a spider on the floor. There are more passages to one side, accessed by a secret door but not apparently going anywhere (unless you decide different, of course).

Level 2, the next plan to be presented, is much smaller, being a series of chambers towards the rear of the fortress. It provides comfortable quarters for the commander, with space for entertaining, and a secret door to further passageways - perhaps a means of escape if things get too rough?

Next up, Level -1 is, as mentioned earlier, spider-shaped. There is a pillared hall in the centre, and each 'leg' of the spider ends in a small room. The introductory text suggests these may be cells for prisoners. The final plan is labelled 'Cross section' but is quite hard to interpret. It doesn't really add anything to understanding the fortress' layout and is rather disappointing.

There is limited customisation, and both blue and black versions of each level. There are also some pages for notes, but you have to print them out and scribble on them.

Overall it makes for quite a nice fortress, either underground as intended or even in a narrow valley or mountain pass aboveground if preferred.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
0one's Blueprints: Drow Outpost
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0one's Blueprints: Hill of Many Dungeons
Publisher: 0one Games
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 12/27/2018 10:30:07

If you have ever visited the Valley of the Kings in Egypt, you probably dreamed of exploring the numerous tombs to be found there. This is the next best thing, a hill with no less than five separate dungeons riddling it. The notes suggest that if you prefer, you can interconnect them or even dispense with the hill and stack them to create a multi-level complex. Several suggestions are provided for what you might put in them but ultimately it's up to you!

The first map provides an overview: the complete hill with all five dungeons outlined. Like all the maps, it's available in either blue or black and white, and you can make limited modifications by means of checkboxes on the blue version (which affect both, so if you want to use the black one, you set up what you want to see on the blue one). Most of the dungeons have entrances from the hillside (one has several), but one in the middle has no obvious means of ingress.

Next up is Dungeon Number 1, which is a purpose-built tomb with several crypts full of coffins as well as a primary burial chamber with yet another coffin on a plinth. This could be anything from a family tomb to the hideout of a whole gang of vampires. A storeroom at one side leads off to some natural caverns at least one of which has been turned into living quarters - by a mage, judging by the summoning circle and pentacle inscribed on the floor. Further away, there's a spiral stair leading who knows where...

Dungeon Number 2 looks deliberately constructed for magical purposes. It has but a single fairly discreet entrance, but some of the mystic circles probably do duty as teleports. Perhaps this is the meeting place of a bunch of wizards who do not want their activities overlooked - maybe they live in a region where magic is controlled or banned, and need a safe place to work. Or they are dangerous magic-wielding revolutionaries...

Dungeon Number 3 has no less than four entrances, each with steps (up or down as you please) leading into a veritable maze of passageways, all constructed. Again this is a magical or possibly clerical community, but one with a more open-door policy than Dungeon Number 2. It has a lot of statues, so unless they venerate mages who have gone before, the place is probably religious in nature.

Dungeon Number 4 also has no discernable entrance, so it's back to teleporting. There is a spiral stair, which may lead to an entrance, however. One hall is so filled with pillars that it will be difficult to move around, let alone see from side to side.

Finally, Dungeon Number 5 has no overt entrances either. Again there's a couple of spiral stairs, which may lead up (or even possibly down) to a way in, and there's a star-shaped chamber with a large pentacle that may serve for teleportation purposes. The complex is dominated by a long hall lined with statue-filled niches, and it also boasts an underground river. Let your imagination run wild as you determine who constructed this and who may be living there now.

There's a lot of scope here. Dream up your backstory and populate one or more of these dungeons with inhabitants all ready for wandering adventurers...



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
0one's Blueprints: Hill of Many Dungeons
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0one's Blueprints: Old Lighthouse
Publisher: 0one Games
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 12/22/2018 10:37:18

For some reason, lighthouses make for good adventures and this one is set up to provide an ideal location. It's on a small island, which you can situate in an appropriate place - marking reefs, or the approaches to a harbour or warning of cliffs - in your campaign world. The first plan provides the entire island, complete with a dock, a small warehouse beside it, and some mysterious ruins as well as the building that provides the lighthouse itself and living quarters for its keepers.

The second plan shows how the island is riddled with caves which interconnect all the structures on the island. Excellent for locating a pirate base, or hiding fugitives plotting against unjust rulers... you see, just looking at these plans spawns ideas for how to use them!

The third plan depicts the lighthouse building itself. It has 2 stories, being quite generous living quarters for the lighthouse-keepers, with a tower at one side to hold the light which stands three of stories higher. There's also a high chamber suitable for keeping a lookout. It's a quite substantial building and would make a nice if isolated home. A side elevation is provided to help you get the picture, before we move on to a plan of the ruined building and the cellars beneath (which connect to the underground caverns, of course).

All plans are presented in black and white or in blue, and are to some measure customisable - you can turn off grid lines, numbering, and furniture (where present). Several pages are provided for you to make notes, but you'll have to print them out to scribble on unless you have a very steady hand at adding text to Acrobat pages!

It all makes for a good base for pirates or anyone who likes the isolation, or indeed if you actually need a lighthouse and the action goes there. With this plan to hand, it probably will!



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
0one's Blueprints: Old Lighthouse
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Land of the Free
Publisher: R. Talsorian Games Inc.
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 12/19/2018 13:56:12

This book contains a vast continent-spanning adventure that all begins with a 'simple' extraction... but they're never that simple, are they? The adventure comes in five parts, and is intended to be played as a whole... almost a mini-campaign really. As the mission involves travelling across the continent, access to the Home of the Brave sourcebook will enhance your game considerably but it's not necessary, there are plenty of resources herein to keep you going as the party encounters bizarre cults, renegade military officers, trail worn nomads, jealous corporations, and many of the splintered, often antagonistic cultures that America has fractured into. They'll need to master the skills of diplomacy as well as those of combat to survive, let alone accomplish their mission.

Although the adventures takes the party cross-country on a fairly defined route - clues in one location lead them naturally to another - there's plenty of scope for side-adventures and other incidents, not part of the main plot, along the way. Some are provided here, more can be gleaned from Home of the Brave if you have it, and of course you can mix in your own ideas.

Designed to accommodate any party irrespective of character experience, there are extensive notes on how to provide an appropriate level of challenge, including a mechanism called Character Party Strength (CPS) which enables you to compare the strength of the party to the strength of the opposition facing them, and so adjust said opposition depending on how much challenge you want them to pose. There's also some general advice about running the adventure, this support continues throughout with specific notes as to how to deal with likely outcomes and issues as they arise in each section of the adventure.

Next, there's a lot of background for the campaign. It's the sort of campaign where background, atmosphere, recurring NPCs and the like are important, so immerse yourself in it. The science of cloning is integral to the plot, so there's plenty of background on advances and attitudes towards it. So far, nobody's managed a viable fully-functional sentient human clone... or have they? It is someone closely associated with cloning experiments that the party are contracted to extract in New York and transport across country to Night City in an airship. Of course, nothing ever quite works to plan...

The journey, as written, takes the party to various locations such as Nashville and Memphis across America, but copious notes are provided to help you should they not go where intended or otherwise try to find some way to thwart the adventure. Some are suggestions for how to get them back on track without making them feel railroaded, others supply inspiration for taking the adventure to them wherever they've chosen to go. Very helpful, and provides ideas for any adventure where the party deviates from the plot... a frequent occurance in my games. This support begins at the beginning with a myriad suggestions as to why they are in New York to begin with, and enabling you to work with an existing team or a group of complete strangers with equal facility. This level of support extends to the adventure itself, seemingly everything is catered for with extensive clues, descriptions, layouts... just about all you need to run each encounter with ease.

Study the adventure well beforehand, then you will be able to take advantage of this wealth of detail, whether the party follows the planned intinerary via Nashville, Memphis, down the river to New Orleans, across the Gulf to Galveston or Corpus Christi and thence on to Night City. There are optional events and encounters galore. Use them. They enhance the adventure no end... especially the chance of doing time in a Texas gaol! Many of the encounters are potentially deadly, in some even an unlucky die roll rather than a poor decision can result in death or serious injury. That's life in 2020 for you! Even once they reach Night City it's not all plain sailing.

This adventure involves combat, intrigue, negotiation, netrunning... the entire gamut of roles and skills will find something to do. Events pour out one upon another in quick succession, there's little chance to get bored in the five to eight sessions this adventure is intended to take. It is cinematic in its intensity, but perhaps better viewed as a mini-series rather than a movie. It's highly recommended, the pinnacle of the published adventures.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Land of the Free
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The One Ring - Laughter of Dragons
Publisher: Cubicle 7 Entertainment Ltd.
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 12/13/2018 10:05:42

If you are after six interlinked adventures set in the Lonely Mountain area which concern the Dwarves of Erebor and the Men of Dale, this is the book you want (you might alsp want the Erebor supplement, but it isn't necessary). The adventures can stand alone or you may prefer to make them a plot arc within your campaign, starting in the year 2956. With Smaug dead, there's a new air of hope in the region and this doesn't suit Sauron one little bit, especially with that meddling wizard Gandalf interfering... so he has hatched another plot. These adventures are all about thwarting various aspects of his latest scheme.

We learn of some of the key players behind these schemes and a bit more about the overarching plot... but if you want to run the adventures as stand alone ones, that's perfectly possible too. The party may never see the full picture, but they'll certainly have an influence on affairs nevertheless. There are suggestions of how to weave the adventures into your campaign, particularly if you intend to run all of them... and then we're off!

It all begins with The Silver Needle, where the party gets a chance to thwart some bandits who want to steal a wondrous artefact that's in Dale. But what are those orcs up to? Investigation proves it's a bit more than a simple heist... but it all begins with a traffic accident that throws chance travellers together as they wait for the obstruction to be cleared. Various individuals are introduced to give colour to the scene, and there are suggested topics for conversation that make the scene come to life, and may provide useful information as well. In due course, the party can attempt to seek out a bandit leader called Longo who has been plaguing the area, if they don't decide to do so themselves, someone will ask or even hire them to do so. A journey over inhospitable ground and even a swamp ensues... and so does a good scrap, during which they'll find out who Longo actually is. Back in Dale, things are coming to a head as his heist is concluded successfully and it's up to the party to do something about it!

Next comes Of Hammer and Anvils, where Bain himself needs a hand. It all begins in Dale and indeed most of the action is there although it eventually leads to Erebor. Poor Balin is attacked and the party gets the chance to save him. It appears that there's a concerted effort on his life, because he is attacked again, successfully. There's a conspiracy in progress, and the party can investigate... but every decision has consequences.

In Dungeons Deep throws the party into a potential quarrel between Erebor and Dale. It's all down to some long-lost treasure that's come to light, but it all begins with a missing scholar, who the party are asked to find. This adventure is a good one for making contacts with significant individuals, but there is plenty of combat as well, never fear, even though the final resolution takes place in a formal council meeting in which the party will be expected to participate. Then, in Sleeping Dragons Lie, the party ends up dealing with one that most definitely isn't asleep, but is annoyed and about to wreak destruction on Erebor. The party is commissioned to slay him before he can cause much trouble, however they have rivals in their quest... and there's other odd stuff going on as well. Watch out for the moving stones! There's an excellent climatic battle scene to round this adventure off.

Next, Dark Waters sees the party in Lake-town preparing to enjoy the festival of Dragontide. But the sculptor of a statue of Bard that is to be unveiled has gone missing, and his apprentice asks the party for their help in locating him. There's a lot of investigation, as one might imagine, but the party will findthemselves fighting for their lives as well. Layers upon layers mean that several people will have to answer for their actions - if they survive long enough.

Finally matters come to a head in Shadows in the North. Balin is warning of trouble, but is himself under the influence of malign forces. Danger is everywhere and the party needs to prioritise their response. By the end many personalities (who the party will have met if they played all the adventures) will have revealed their true colours and, hopefully, be brought to an accounting. The hand behind all the plots is revealed and the party has a chance to put paid to the entire plot. This is quite an edge-of-the-seat adventure, everyhting piling up at once and needing to be dealt with.

This is an excellent plot arc, exciting and meaningful and would make a good centre to a campaign, or a fascinating thread running through a campaign, as you see fit. Save the world from Sauron. Again.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
The One Ring - Laughter of Dragons
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