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Testament: Roleplaying in the Biblical Era $14.95
Average Rating:4.5 / 5
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Testament: Roleplaying in the Biblical Era
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Testament: Roleplaying in the Biblical Era
Publisher: Green Ronin
by James M. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 12/02/2012 23:38:11

I love this. However, there are some terrible formatting mistakes in the PDF version. In the descriptions of the Nephilim, no less....



Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Testament: Roleplaying in the Biblical Era
Publisher: Green Ronin
by Michael M. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 10/04/2007 20:46:17

Testament is one of those rare books that manages to find the sweet spot between history and fantasy in the field of d20 RPG. I tend to echo the other reviews and agree the presentation and new rules (like piety, mass combat, mythic feat etc) are excellent. Very little “feats for feats” sake that many other supplements suffer from. It’s not a splat book. My introduction into the Mythic Worlds was actually the Medieval Players Handbook which I bought when it came out. However Testament has sucked me in in a way that the Medieval Handbook did not. It’s especially useful to me personally as I run a mythic earth campaign (unbeknownst to my players - yet) in the antediluvian age for the past 10+ years.

One thing I need to mention that hasn’t in the other reviews (who do a good job covering the feats, classes etc so I wotn repeat what they say) is the mass combat rules.

I love them.

I have been looking for something like this for a while now and bought a few supplements just for their mass rules. However others went from being too abstract with little to no PC input (like the Malhavoc War supplement) to being too detailed where every piece is an individual NPC with stats (ala D&D miniatures) and is therefore way too time consuming to play out as part of a D&D campaign. The Testament system strikes the perfect balance (again) between the heroes who lead the battle and the mass troops who are “extras” but still important to the storey and battle being fought.

However it’s not perfect. Some Bible passages are interpreted way out of left field when compared to both Jewish and Christian cannon. For some I can understand this. The Genesis quote about the “Sons of God” and “daughters of men” uses an ancient and now defunct view that the Sons of God were angels who bred with humans. I can understand using this unusal interpretation since I do exactly the same thing in my campaign. The tertiary, albeit incorrect, view makes for a much better RPG. However other quotes suffer from the usual problem of the idea that somehow Israel ripped off storey/myths from Babylon etc. For example the reference of Tiamat and the primordial sea during the creation week. All of this has been refuted by scholars for centuries. Changes like this doesn’t seem to add anything to the game unlike the Genesis interpretation.

One last quibble is the seemingly random design decision of reducing the God of Israel to the equivalent of Baal, Amun-Ra and Tiamat. I am not sure what the logic is here. Did they not want to offend Babylonians or Caanites ….? It seems to me it would make more sense to make the God of Israel supreme above the other gods since there isn’t anyone to offend and, in reality, He won – those other religions are dead. I can understand why you would do this in the Medieval Handbook since all the beliefs in that game are still around today. The only reason I can see a designer would do this is because of their own personal bias. In fact I have to commend the authors since they are clearly not Christian or Jewish adherents that they did a great job of veiling their own personal views. Only peeping through here and there in the manual.

Apart from the issues I listed previously I would recommend it to anyone. It does a good job of representing the Biblical Israel and that nation’s peers at the time. Probably the best things its done to me is introduced me to the Mythic Vista line. And those fantastic mass combat rules.

4.5/5. Almost perfect.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Testament: Roleplaying in the Biblical Era
Publisher: Green Ronin
by Hardy L. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 02/27/2006 00:00:00

This covers most of the lands in and around the two rivers. It is a key component in my mythic Earth campaign.<br><br> <b>LIKED</b>: I liked mostly all of it.<br><br><b>DISLIKED</b>: More details on the other peoples of Asia-minor/Mesopotamian/Northern Africa region.<br><br><b>QUALITY</b>: Excellent<br><br><b>VALUE</b>: Very Satisfied<br>



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Testament: Roleplaying in the Biblical Era
Publisher: Green Ronin
by Spencer C. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 10/27/2005 00:00:00

A solid product that does a good job of balancing religious themes, historicity, and - well - fantasy. Nothing leaps out as spectacular or earth-shatteringly fantastic (except the fact that it's a solid conversion of a text rich not only in historical tradition but religious tradition as well - which is certainly no small feat!), but there are no egregious flaws here. Just a solid, well-put-together, all around excellent entry. <br><br><b>QUALITY</b>: Acceptable<br><br><b>VALUE</b>: Satisfied<br><BR>[THIS REVIEW WAS EDITED]<BR>



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Testament: Roleplaying in the Biblical Era
Publisher: Green Ronin
by Nick M. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 06/20/2005 00:00:00

this is simply excellent. I am really tempted to end my current oriental scenario to move my players into this setting. i use my own rule system but its easy to extrapolate from this product to capture the feel of the period.

this produce needs a rating beyond 5 stars<br><br><b>LIKED</b>: it captures the feel of the period 100% (well as far as anyone from the 21st century can guess) without bogging the DM/Player down with un-needed detail<br><br><b>DISLIKED</b>: i would have like to have seen even more info on the non Israelite peoples but its a very minor gripe<br><br><b>QUALITY</b>: Acceptable<br><br><b>VALUE</b>: Very Satisfied<br>



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Testament: Roleplaying in the Biblical Era
Publisher: Green Ronin
by Chris H. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 05/06/2005 00:00:00

This is absolutely my favorite d20 setting book ever. Designer Scott Bennie and editor Spike Jones have done a masterful job of translating the Levantine world into a d20 setting. This is almost literally "Bible D&D," and although you might not think so at first, it works. The setting and rules are Israel-centric, and thus give the richest detail to the Israelite character classes (psalmist, judge, prophet, and so on) and to the Israelite history and culture. Yet Egypt, Canaan, and Mesopotamia are not overlooked, and each culture has unique character classes, spells, and so on. Don't look at this setting book as a religious exercise; it's a fantasy game through and through, even though it has a historical setting. If you're looking for a specifically Judeo-Christian role-playing experience, Testament won't give it to you without some tinkering, as Testament gives "parity" to Israelite, Canaanite, Mesopotamian, and Egyptian religions. I like this supplement so much I have an entire web site devoted to enriching it: www.codicil.info. Thank you, Green Ronin, for making it available as a PDF! BUY THIS PRODUCT NOW!<br><br><b>LIKED</b>: Almost everything! The Israelite character classes are well done, many of the spells are innovative, and the feats are well chosen and well constructed. I like the mass battle rules in the abstract sense, but I haven't had a chance to carefully compare and contrast them with other d20 mass battle rules. The Piety system is a great alternative to the standard alignment system.<br><br><b>DISLIKED</b>: Well, I could nitpick about things like the word "qedeshot" being misused as a singular (the singular is "qedesah," plural "qedeshot") but I do that on my website, so I won't do it here. There are some proofreading errors in the book, such as references in one part of the book to spells or special abilities that were edited out of other parts, and the "broken links" weren't fixed. But these are pretty easy to work around. My only other "complaint," so to speak, is that it's a 3.0, not 3.5 product, but remember that the original print version was released just before the 3.5 rulebooks, so the 3.0 version is to be expected.<br><br><b>QUALITY</b>: Excellent<br><br><b>VALUE</b>: Very Satisfied<br>



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
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