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AM7: Metamorphosis Alpha to Omega Game
Publisher: Wizards of the Coast
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 05/27/2019 08:37:05

This 'universe book' for Amazing Engine opens with the complete core ruleset as described in the Amazing Engine System Guide (so you don't need to buy that) and so can be regarded as a complete game. You do, however, have to create a Player Core if you don't already have one before making your Player Character - the Player Core is a high-level overview of the type of character you prefer to play (the assumption being that you go for the same type all the time and irrespective of setting) which allows you, for example, to transfer experience between your characters in different universes (as defined by the various universe books)... even though you cannot actually transfer an entire character from one universe to another. This time it's well integrated with the particular universe in question, so the overview of character creation uses setting-appropriate races, skills, and so on.

Then on to the Preface. This explains this setting's origins in the 1975 Metamorphosis Alpha game which concerned a lost starship - a generation ship - and the effect that isolation had upon the crew. Think of it as a science-fiction dungeon, an enclosed and finite space filled with all manner of creatures and technology, with most of the inhabitants having no idea that they are even on a ship.

Concept introduced, we take a look at The History of the Starship Warden. At the dawn of space exploration, generation ships were sent out to establish colonies who then, as colonies do, decided that they wanted to become independent. Earth didn't care much for that and in gearing up to keep them by force created a massive supercomputer to defend Earth... only it got a virus, ran amok and destroyed great swathes of the very planet it was supposed to protect. Not surprisingly, nobody paid much attention to the next generation ship that had recently departed... some 18 years after its launch, Earth communications just ceased. A few years later they had their own disaster, passing through an undetected cloud of radiation that affected virtually all parts of the ship and everything aboard. With most people dead and the majority of the rest mutated, some thirty years later they reached their destination where the few surviving crew and their descendents (who had barricaded themselves on the bridge) initiated terraforming - and were then overrun by mutated passengers who had lost most of their understanding of what the ship's original mission was. The ultimate objective of the party will be to find out what is going on and perhaps initiate colonisation of the virgin world awaiting them below.

The next section discusses the roles of both player and GM. Player-characters may be intelligent animals, mutated humans, 'pure' humans or even intelligent plants. (I assume that 'intelligent' means 'sentient' here.) Moving on to GMs, there are suggestions for campaigns, beginning with the party completely unaware that they are on a ship at all. Once they discover that, they'll be able to move to different levels and explore more fully. An alternative is to have them awaken from a VERY long cryogentic sleep, original crew members frozen soon after launch as their skills would not be required until they reached their destination... only the poor dears have lost their memories and have no idea where they are or what they are supposed to do. (This can be entertaining, I played in something similar a few years back.) Or they may know exactly who they are and why they were 'sleeping' - but have no idea what has happened on board ship during the centuries they were asleep... You could even have them be on another ship entirely, just encountering this strange vessel and going to explore. The possibilities are endless, there are eight suggested here but you might come up with one of your own instead.

Next, we run through character creation. This includes devising interesting (and useful) mutations for humans, animals and plants, with notes on how they all work within the game mechanics as well as descriptions. Skills are likewise detailed. Awards and Experience and Tech Levels are the next two sections, along with a section on Artefacts. There's a delightful chart to aid in figuring out what an artefact does, which may lead the party to come to a completely wrong conclusion perfectly logically! There are loads of sample artefacts to try it out on as well.

Then there is a chapter devoted to Combat and the rules pertaining to it. Options are discussed at length. This is followed by a collection of Creatures of the Starship Warden - your monster collection, and a weird and wonderful lot they are too. Artificial lifeforms are not neglected with a chapter on The Robotic Opponent to give you plenty of ideas.

Finally, there's a massive deck-by-deck gazetteer of the entire ship. There are nine decks in total. Just reading through it will spawn ideas of adventures to run on each deck.

This is a good interpretation of the 'generation ship gone wrong' concept using the Amazing Engine ruleset. Whether or not you are familar with the original Metamorphosis Alpah - or for that matter the Gamma World series that followed it - this has the potential for some great gaming.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
AM7: Metamorphosis Alpha to Omega Game
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AM6: Once And Future King Universe Book
Publisher: Wizards of the Coast
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 05/27/2019 08:33:08

This 'universe book' for Amazing Engine opens with the complete core ruleset as described in the Amazing Engine System Guide (so you don't need to buy that) and so can be regarded as a complete game. You do, however, have to create a Player Core if you don't already have one before making your Player Character - the Player Core is a high-level overview of the type of character you prefer to play (the assumption being that you go for the same type all the time and irrespective of setting) which allows you, for example, to transfer experience between your characters in different universes (as defined by the various universe books)... even though you cannot actually transfer an entire character from one universe to another.

Then we get on to the main meat of this book. It concerns King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table, but not as you imagine them in a romanticised and somewhat innaccurate mediaeval time... this time they are to be found in a high-technology science-fiction setting in a distant future! The solar system has been colonised and now consists of several feudal kingdoms ruled by powerful warriors under a high king of the Holy Terran Empire, one Arthur by name. Like his namesake, he has Knights of the Round Table who roam across the Solar System, battling evil knights, strange monsters, and ruthless technological wizards, in order to bring peace and safety to all. 'Technologers', who study science and technology at a school called Avalon, wield great power that's nigh indistingishable from magic; and the code by which every good knight lives is derived from Theanthropy, a religious/moral teaching that holds that one should aspire to truth, wisdom, strength, hope, humility, faith, and courage in an attempt to avoid the sins of pride, envy, greed, hatred, egotism, sloth, and injustice.

We start off in Chapter 1: Character Creation with finding out how to create Player Characters, who can be Knights, Technologers, Acolytes, or Courtiers. All have a part to play, and a well-rounded party won't just consist of Knights. They also can be human beings, enhanced clone humans or androids... or crossbreeds of human and clone. Given the benefits, it is likely that most Player Characters will be crossbreeds. There's plenty of detail about the four professions and how to construct characters suitable to practice them. A neat note that amongst the Technologer careers is that of Sourcerer, which I have not mis-spelled: a Sourcerer is someone so good at computer programming that he can alter the source code of the main computer mainframe! The notes on each profession give a good overview of the way in which society is ordered as well, thus introducing key elements of the setting as you work on your character. This chapter ends with detailed notes on the skills available and what you can do with them.

Next, Chapter 2: Technology provides information on what technology in the 46th century AD is like. Most folk don't understand it at all, regarding it as a black art undersood only by Technologers. It's not magic, but to all intents and purposes to most people it might as well be. A lot runs automatically, with big computers in the basement of your castle keeping an eye on things... and all other computers are controlled by a big one in Avalon. There once was an AI called Merlin which meddled in affairs and saw to the rise of a clone knight called Uther... but that was defeated and wiped from the core by a Sourceress called Nimue, although the code lingers on in a deep vault somewhere, tis said. We also get the low-down on androids and space travel - both in regular or 'direct' space, and in 'sidespace', a parallel dimension to our own. There's also an assortment of gadgets and vehicles including the 'robohorse' - where would a knight be without a faithful steed? There's also a 'hoversteed', a newfangled contraption with no legs, and if you are very traditional and rich you can still obtain real live horses. There are rules for designing and making your own devices, and some sample ones to show you what can be done.

Chapter 3: Combat looks at how fighting works. Of particular interest are the rules for jousting, which works rather differently from standard brawling with melee or projectile weapons. It looks quite complex but is actually quite straightforward and exciting once you get the hang of it. There are two forms, the tilt and the duel. Tilts may be competitive or just for sport - or to resolve a point of honour - but there is no intention to kill anyone, whereas a duel can be to the death if the combatants harbour that much animosity towards one another. The tilt finishes when someone is knocked off his horse, the duel continues on foot. There are plenty of examples to help you understand the mechanics.

Next is Chapter 4: A Brief History of Chivalry. This is composed of four sections. The first begins with the original period that we're all familiar with, and provides a timeline up to the present day (in game terms). From there follow three distinct periods in the life of the King Arthur of this setting to use as a basis for your own game. The first of these covers his birth, beginning when two brothers - Uther and Aurelius - make a power-grab. Aurelius steps aside, leaving Uther to claim the throne as Uther Pendragon, high king of the solar system. He sleeps with Igraine, at that time still married to someone else, and they have a child - Arthur - who has to be hurried away amidst disapproval. Subsequently Uther's kingdom falls apart and... well, you know the story. Once Arthur has claimed and fought for the kingdom, the next section begins with the formation of the Round Table. The final section covers the latter years of Arthur's life and his death. It's up to you which of these three periods attracts you the most.

Chapter 5: Places of Interest provides a gazetteer of the solar system, and is followed by Chapter 6: Important People. Here are details of major players including stat block, role-playing notes and personal histories (which may change depending on which period you choose to play and party actions). Some of Arthur's enemies are here too, but the main focus is on Knights of the Round Table and other members of Arthur's Court - and Arthur himself, of course. For more opposition, consult Chapter 7: Monsters and Other Creatures. These include dragons, but don't hunt them: these ones are wise and compassionate.

Chapter 8: Campaigning in the Universe provides a lot more background and ideas for the GM, beginning with an explanation of feudal society. The reason for having one in this setting is laid out: when the clone warriors were first invented, they were programmed with the attitudes and ideals of mediaeval chivalry as a means to keep them in check... and it took far better than expected. However it misses the core of the feudal system, that obligations exist in both directions. A feudal lord is required to sustain and protect his vassals every bit as much as they are required to serve and support him, a key difference between feudalism and any other non-democratic form of governance. There are details of the campaign setting including the pervasive religion called Theanthropy. This includes beliefs, the calendar, and miracles - and yes, the Holy Grail. There is a remarkably brief outline of heraldry, if you want your knights to have well-designed coats of arms a bit of further research will be necessary. Notes on awarding experience and a goodly selection of adventure ideas round the chapter off. Finally, there's an entire adventure to get you started. Quest for the Golden Tower makes for a good introduction to the setting and even comes with a pre-generated party if you don't want to create your own characters immediately.

The whole thing is a delightful conceit, taking the well-known tales of King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table and making of them a science-fantasy that holds together remarkably well.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
AM6: Once And Future King Universe Book
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AM5: The Galactos Barrier
Publisher: Wizards of the Coast
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 05/27/2019 07:49:42

This Amazing Engine universe book, unlike its predecessors, is a complete game. It contains all the material first published in the Amazing Engine System Guide as well as the universe-specific information that you will need. This introduces the concepts of Player Core and Player Character, which enables you to set up a base Player Core that reflects the type of character you like to play (does he emphasise intelligence, brute strength, being sneaky, or whatever) and enables you to reflect that in the Player Character you build for the universe in which the next game is set. It also enables experience from one character to be passed along to another, even though he's a completely different person. These concepts are a bit strange in some ways. I tend to decide on the character I want to play depending on the setting rather than have a 'generic' preferred type, and while a multi-setting game can appeal when the same character can appear anywhere, this isn't the case here, you have to set up a completely different Player Character for each one, even though you are using a common Player Core.

Once the generic parts of the system - the Player Core and the basics of the game mechanics - have been covered, we then get on to the 'universe' or setting part of the book. The Galactos Barrier is introduced as a science-fantasy game. Yes, it has a science-fiction setting, but there are elements of fantasy here, in fact, the kind of wonder a fantasy setting can evoke are the main focus.

The setting itself is an ancient interstellar empire that is drifting further and further towards evil, which given that its foundation was based on piracy is understandable. While a few in authority work for the common good, most are out for themselves and are happy to destroy anyone who gets in their way. There are still a select few who resist this trend... mostly operating outside the law as interstellar pirates, smugglers, guns-for-hire, revolutionaries, and more. These will include the player characters, of course. The intention is for a light-hearted fun game, a space opera approach, high fantasy set amongst the stars.

The background information begins with a timeline for the empire. Some 3,000 years into its history (and that's 3,000-odd years before the present - told you it was an ancient empire!) something called the Music of the Spheres was discovered, psionic powers that allow practitioners to achieve things beyond the capacity of normal human beings. This exciting time also saw the introduction of new and improved spaceships capable of faster-than-light travel by means of going through alternate dimensions (the Tesseract drive) and the development of Artificial Intelligence (AI). Neither of these developments got far due to official disapproval and public disquiet (the AI robots had not been programmed to avoid harm to human beings), and the psionic practitioners turned out to be quite squabblesome. The next millennium saw the beginings of a slide into decadence that has only got worse with time. There's much more too, a vast history of tensions and developments that provide a rich backdrop to your game.

Next comes a section on character creation. You can play a human, an alien or a robot. Most aliens are humanoid, and some example races are provided (but you can come up with your own, if preferred). There's even a shapeshifter race whose natural form is a blob of jelly as well as more conventional reptiloid and avian races and more. As well as deciding on a profession for your character, you also need to give him a social class, something regarded as important in the empire. Professions provide the basis for skills... which are expanded upon in their own section in great detail.

Character done, there's a section with information about everyday life in the present day. There's a frontier mentality out there on the space lanes, based on the slow speed of communication - nothing travels faster than the fastest star ship. Many people do not rely on the rule of law but on themselves for protection, so carrying weapons is normal behaviour. There are also notes on NPCs, a few ideas for standard ones that can be built on as needed.

Next we learn about the Music of the Spheres. A Player-Character wishing to be able to use it must have Spirit as their major ability... that gives them the potential to use it, they then have to seek a mentor or attempt to release it for themselves. Interestingly, the whole system is described in musical terms... but not used as a musician might, so pay attention to the glossary provided to understand the terminology applied here. There are three Colleges of Music, but this is not so much referring to a school but a discipline, a way of thinking... and they squabble, at times even resorting to all-out war to settle their differences. You can swiftly drown in the terminology, but at length we reach the importance bit, what you can actually do with it. These are called Pieces and each piece brings about certain effects. It is an interesting and potentially powerful system, but one that will require a fair bit of effort on the part of the player to get right. Unless, of course, you just treat the pieces as spells and use them without referring to the underlying philosophy. That would work in game, but loses out on what makes this a rich and strange system.

Back to more mundane affairs next, with a section on Technology and Money. There's a wide range of items from weapons, medical supplies and communicators to vehicles and spaceships - quite a few sample ships here, and of course weapons and other enhancements you can add to your chosen vessel. The next chapter covers Combat, beginning with hand-to-hand and building up to spaceship actions. Fighting ON spaceships is also dealt with, including the effects of breaching the hull and variable gravity effects.

Moving on, a look at Space. It's big, and it has all sorts of fascinating things in it. Here we learn how to design planets to visit and about space travel, and there's a selection of sample planets to visit and have adventures on. This continues in the next chapter, The Domain Now, which looks at the socio-political scene replete with ideas for adventure springing from the background material. Finally to get you started there are some adventure ideas you can develop.

This makes for a fascinating basis for a space opera game, with its innovative psionic system and deep background. It needs, however, a fair bit of work on the part of the GM before you are ready to sit down round a table and actually play... but when you do, a fun game should ensue.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
AM5: The Galactos Barrier
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AM4: MAGITECH Universe Book
Publisher: Wizards of the Coast
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 05/27/2019 07:44:05

This universe book was spawned by the question "What would an AD&D campaign world look like if it evolved into the 20th Century?" - something I've often wondered myself. It changed in development to become a modern world with fantasy elements rather than the author's original concept of a fusion between magic and technology, ending up with a world where magical items are as commonplace as technological ones are in the real world. In this world, magic is based on mathematics and it can be studied at university. As has been speculated, magic has developed at the expense of technology, and fills a similar role.

The Introduction lays this all out and more, explaining how this book should be used in conjunction with the Amazing Engine System Guide (but that no other books are required). As well as some rules notes, it gives an overview of what the setting is like, and as such is essential reading for players and GMs alike. More detail on the setting comes in an appendix, which may be deemed more apropriate for the GM alone.

So, the setting is a 1990s Earth that is home to several other sentient races apart from human beings. There are elves and dwarves, centaurs, minotaurs and more. They are not newcomers, they have been here all along, and play as much a role in public life and the sweep of history as anyone else. In this world, there were a couple of world wars earlier in the 20th century, but they were caused by a bunch of dwarves having expansionist ideas rather than the Germans. Space travel is quite well advanced: Venus has been terraformed, and people also visit Mars. Flying carpets replace cars, and you contact people with a crystal ball or a mirror.

Chapter 1 covers character creation, drawing on the Amazing Engine System Guide for the character core on which each player character is based. The core idea is that each character is ready to leave whatever hum-drum life they led (but which gave them their skills and knowledge) to become 'adventurers', exploring the wilder and woolier corners of Earth and beyond in search of fame and fortune. Of course, they may be of any playable sentient race, and you also have to select a former profession - many of those outlined sound familiar but have a twist to them, others are outright novel such as the professional wizard. You'll also have to select skills and equipment... and a bit of background is good, too. Where did the character grow up, and what education did he have? Chapter 2 covers skills in great detail, aiding you both in choosing the best ones for your character concept and in using them once play commences.

Chapter 3 covers the operation of magic, with Chapter 4 containing spells themselves. An attempt has been made to give it a scientific-sounding grounding, but if science and maths are not your strong point don't worry, this is more technobabble that of direct use when actually playing a spell-caster. The actual game mechanics are reasonably straightforward, although they are explained in a rather verbose manner. This is followed by Chapter 5: Items and Equipment, devoted to the objects found in the game including money, armour, weapons, and an array of items of clothing and day-to-day useful bits and bobs. As gunpowder has not been invented, guns do not feature large although there are some magically-operated ones. Magic is all-pervasive, things you might not expect to be magical are - take, for example, a suit of camouflage clothing - here it's enchanted with a blend spell to make you, well, blend into the background. Modes of transport just have to be seen to be believed, there's some real innovative thinking here. With the reliance on magic for everyday life, it's all rather reminiscent of the Wizard of 4th Street series by Simon Hawke.

Next, Chapter 6: Running the Magitech Game looks at the specific game mechanics required during play, with a heavy focus on combat. It also discusses the sort of campaigns and adventures that you might run and provides several ideas for adventures ready for you to develop. It's a bit of an uneasy mix, as the rules material is as useful to players as to GMs, but later parts of the chapter are more aimed at GMs. Finally there are several Appendices, covering NPCs and Monsters, alternative campaign ideas and a map of the known worlds - Earth and Venus - and a glossary.

It's an entertaining take on an alternate world where magic really works and fantasy races rub shoulders with human beings in every walk of life.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
AM4: MAGITECH Universe Book
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AM3: BUGHUNTERS Universe Book
Publisher: Wizards of the Coast
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 05/27/2019 07:40:07

Opening with an introduction to the Bughunters Universe, this is the second 'universe book' for Amazing Engine. Looking over the table of contents, it's made up of a Player Section and a GM Section as well as the aforementioned Introduction and a starmap.

Introduction: The Bughunters Universe begins with a quote comparing human beings to rats and cockroaches - before you bristle too much, all three species are exceptional at surviving against the odds. It goes on to explain that this is an action game in a gritty near-future where space colonisation has begun, but is still a chancy business. Player-characters are 'synthetic humans', vat-grown clones modified to serve as starship crews, combat teams and general troubleshooters. Tougher physically and mentally than regular human beings, they're real people too. It also explains how this book and the Amazing Engine System Guide interface, you need both to play. If this will be your first Amazing Engine game, you have to create a 'player core' using the System Guide rules and then your player character for Bughunters, but if you already have a 'player core' from another game you use that in creating your character.

There then follows an overview timeline from 2009AD to 2130 when the game is set. This begins with some big corporations being given a voice in the United Nations, which they quite naturally immediately take over. Space exploration is a beneficiary, with NASA and the European Space Agency merging, space stations being built and new developments such as the Isler Jump Drive, a hyperspace system, and artificial gravity aiding exploration of this solar system and beyond.

The Player Section follows, containing everything you need (apart from material in the Amazing Engine System Guide) to play this game. It covers player character creation, skill use, combat procedure, equipment, and what the characters know about the galaxy. It starts off by explaining all about these synthetic human clones (known as 'synners') which are created by a top-secret cloning process by the UTRPF, world government United Terra's military arm to serve as troopers, for as long as they might live. Human rights activists have plenty to say about that, as you might imagine, but normal humans view them somewhat askance and don't really want them living in the community alongside them. Although they look like exceptionally fit human beings, synners have a tattoo on the forehead, visible under UV, to distinguish them.

Character generation is designed to reflect their enhanced toughness, and available skills are geared towards making effective soldiers and troubleshooters. However, each one is created from a donor and ought to receive that donor's memories so other skills and abilities may also be there - if the process worked correctly. Sometimes it does not, and there is a neat game mechanic to accommodate this. This chapter covers the full character generation process right through to assigning the individual's rank. Note that synners cannot attain commissioned officer status, that is reserved for 'normal' humans.

Next comes detail of all military skills that are available, along with copious detail on how they are used in the game. This is followed by a chapter Playing the Role which explores the nature, the very essence, of a synner to aid in role-playing one to effect. It makes for fascinating - sometimes scary - reading, thoroughly recommended to help you get under the skin of your character. Each synner, as mentioned earlier, retains the memories of their donor up until the time of the donation which leaves them knowing about his family and friends... which are not yours but his, despite their vividness. Most synners are fundementally sad and lonely because of this even though they have ample opportunities for comradeship with their peers, and live relatively normal lives with time for social pursuits when not engaged on active service. Notes on both daily life and the missions undertaken explain this.

Extensive detail on combat follows, covering not just regular skirmishing but vehicular and aerospace combat as well. This chapter ends with a section on 'repair' (healing in other words), and then there's a chapter on Equipment. This is mainly weapons and other military gear (armour, communications equipment and so on) but there's also medical supplies and vehicles and a detailed section on space ships. Naturally the UTRPF supplies all that is needed for a mission - and do so to a very high standard, they're not known for stinting. There's also a chapter devoted to the UTRPF home base, called Stargate - an orbital facility - which is where characters are cloned, trained, and live between missions.

We then move on to GM territory, beginning with a chapter on Running the Bughunters Game. Plenty of ideas here as it's described as a game of both action and horror. Pacing, mood, mystery and more are discussed here, and it helps the GM to understand the nature of the game and to set the scene for the whole group. It also looks at awarding experience and other rewards. Being a military-oriented game, this can include handing out medals - the examples given are American, but if you want to design your own to reflect a more international future that would probably fit the game better. This is followed by a chapter on Non-Player Characters... which actually consists of an assortment of alien monsters. The existence of sentient aliens isn't really known yet, at least not to the population at large. Keep them as a surprise for your players, too!

Finally there's a collection of Sample Adventures. This provides plenty of ideas for the sort of adventures that you might want to create from travelling the stars to dealing with insurgence, and even perhaps playing out events when the characters are between missions. Several specimen adventures are provided - at the 'full outline' level - to get you started. At the end, there's some suggested reading and viewing for those in search of further ideas and inspiration.

This all holds together well, with plenty to get your teeth into to create a meaningful and memorable campaign. Think Aliens, think Starship Troopers. Plenty of adventure awaits!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
AM3: BUGHUNTERS Universe Book
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TABLOID! Universe Book
Publisher: Wizards of the Coast
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 05/27/2019 07:31:25

This 'universe book' for Amazing Engine opens with the complete core ruleset as described in the Amazing Engine System Guide (so you don't need to buy that) and so can be regarded as a complete game. You do, however, have to create a Player Core if you don't already have one before making your Player Character - the Player Core is a high-level overview of the type of character you prefer to play (the assumption being that you go for the same type all the time and irrespective of setting) which allows you, for example, to transfer experience between your characters in different universes (as defined by the various universe books)... even though you cannot actually transfer an entire character from one universe to another.

The actual setting is then introduced in a section entitled Everything You Read Is True! The concept is that all the wild tales you read in supermarket tabloids and the Fortean Times or see on some of the more dubious TV documentaries is actual fact. Bigfoot. Aliens. The Loch Ness Monster. Assorted celebrities not being dead but hiding out somewhere - JFK, Elvis, whoever you care to name. And of course the conspiracy theorists have the right of it. Nobody's landed on the Moon yet, and UFOs really exist. Now I've often found this sort of material of use when planning games that walk along the edge of reality, but this time these tall tales are the core of the game itself, and the party are all employed as reporters for one of these supermarket tabloids, researching and telling these tall tales... and, yes, they are all true!

At several points, the comment is made that this game is supposed to be silly. Personally, I find it more entertaining when played straight. Certainly, as far as the player-characters are concerned, it's all deadly serious. As for your gaming group, they hopefully have at least some grip on reality, but there's no reason not to play this game like any other. After all, we play wizards and dwarves and spacemen and superheroes without labelling the game 'silly' even though we know they are not real. It's just that this alternate reality is a little more zany than many, and being set in the present day highlights the differences.

The rest of the book consists of several chapters. The first four pick up where the core rules at the beginning of the book leave off, and by the end of them you should have a fully-fledged group of player-characters all rareing to get out and find their Pulitzer-prize winning stories. The next four chapters set the scene for the game and may also be read by players, then at the end there are adventure ideas and other material best left to the Editor, as the Game Master is called here.

There's a rather neat idea behind the character creation system here. All characters are going to be reporters, but the tabloids are not the sort of place a trained journalist wants to end up, so it is assumed that the entire party did something else before they hired on - and it is this carefully-crafted background that gives them their skills. Carefully-crafted? Well, it's more a case of rolling stacks of dice on some tables until you have filled all the skill slots available. As well as a regular character sheet, a worksheet is provided at the back of the book to facilitate this process. This is a 'lifepath' system that builds your character's résumé as it builds the character himself. It can get a little silly, and ought to prove entertaining with both the randomicity and the actual skills and other stuff available giving rise to some hilarious backgrounds. There's lots of detail explaining what the skills are and how to use them in the game.

There's a really quite entertaining chapter called The Tabloid Reporter's Beat which lays out what the party ought to be doing now they are honest-to-goodness tabloid reporters, and the equipment they get to do it with. And another neat thing, in this game as the party are, after all, reporters they not only have adventures, they get to write them up as well! There's a system for that, quite slick, so they won't spend half the session chewing pencils and wondering what to say. There's also a system for calculating remuneration, very important for tabloid reporters scrabbling to survive on the mean streets! Should your party ever get into a brawl, there are a few rules for that as well. In true tabloid style, character death does not necessarily mean that it's time to roll up a new character, though...

Next comes a chapter called Anything For A Laugh. This is for those who take the game's label of "silly" seriously, a collection of ideas for making a comedic game actually work at your tabletop. Finally there are some adventures for the party to cut their journalistic teeth on. Also, sample stories tabloid style are scattered throughout the entire book, any of them might inspire you to create a story of your own.

Whether played as silly as the author intends or in a more serious vein - at least as far as the player-characters are concerned - there's plenty of scope to have some fun with this one.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
TABLOID! Universe Book
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Odysseys & Overlords Player's Guide
Publisher: Aegis Studios
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 05/20/2019 10:21:23

The book opens with a broad sweep of the history of the land. A long time - a thousand years or more - ago, the gods lived in peace and prosperity amongst mortals, with magic and learning flowing freely and animals also living in peace. Unfortunately that didn't last, due rather predictably to the gods squabbling and spoiling it all for everyone. When the brawling stopped, most of the gods were either dead or had departed, leaving mortals to fend for themselves. A few hung around hoping to be worshipped but in the main mortals relied on military might to decide matters of rulership and even righteousness. The land is now fragmented, with islands of civilisation separated by wild lands where bandits and monsters hold sway. People rely on Adventuring Companies (guess who?) to bridge these gaps and protect those who would travel. There are also plenty of ruins filled with relics of happier times to loot. What more could one want for an adventure setting?

A character, that's what, so the next part of the book explains how to go about making one. It's recommended that you use The Basic Fantasy Role-playing Game ruleset, which is available as a free download, written with 'old style rules' play in mind, and also suitable for introducing younger players to role-playing. The instructions for rolling up a character are beautifully clear. To start with, get a piece of paper and a pencil. Roll 4d6 dropping the lowest die and adding the rest up to generate your ability scores. Next you choose a genus and class, making sure you meet any prerequisites for them in terms of ability scores. Of course, there is a bit more detail than that, but not much, and everything is made clear, although you do need to read through the final steps of character creation before you find out what a 'genus' is let alone what you can choose!

The genus (pl. genera) is the equivalent of race in most games. These ones draw on the history outlined earlier, and are groups who took different paths during the squabble of the gods but all are based on normal mortals, except Wildfolk who are descendants of mating between humans and animals, which was considered normal in ancient times. They are Abyss-Kissed, Human, Spellscorched and Wildfolk.

Next, the classes: Bard, Cleric, Fighter, Magic-User and Thief. In general, once chosen you have to stick to your class, only Spellscorched are permitted to be combination classed, and then only Fighter/Magic-User or Magic-User/Thief are allowed. Genus also affects class choices, some genera are limited in the choices they can make. Money and equipment lists round out this section, so by now the character is just about fully equipped and ready to go...

... unless, of course, they wish to wield magic. There's a comprehensive section for both Clerics and Magic-Users, with spell lists for both and a massive alphabetical list of spells with full details of how that spell is cast and what happens when it is. Both game mechanical and flavour aspects are handled clearly.

This magic section consumes much of the rest of the book, but there's space to explain what dungeon and wilderness adventuring is all about; along with a section on hirelings and services, as well as that all-important matter of combat. This section explains how combat is conducted, what your character can do, and includes things like turning undead as well as actual brawling. And that's it. Short and sweet, and notable for the clarity of explanation. Off you go and enjoy adventuring!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Odysseys & Overlords Player's Guide
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Thank you so much for this excellent, thorough review!
Odysseys & Overlords Free Preview
Publisher: Aegis Studios
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 05/17/2019 08:39:11

Opening with an account of a golden past, when people lived in harmony with their gods, all was peaceful, a time of learning and of plenty, we then hear how it all went wrong predictably enough by the gods starting to squabble amongst themselves and wrecking it all for everybody else. Mortal lands lie divided, with brave adventurers (guess who?) guiding people between them and dealing with monsters, exploring ruins to find relics of the lost golden age over a thousand years in the past.

Next, there's an overview of character creation. Notes explain that Odysseys and Overlords is designed to be used with the Basic Fantasy Role-Playing Game, but any 'old school rules' will do: it's aimed at those who like that style of play... just about everything you need is here, though. Every character has a genus (equivalent to race) and a class, the one chosen to demonstrate how classes are presented is that of the Bard. It's all pretty familiar if you have played a bard in any class/level fantasy game - bards can fight a bit but their primary skills are in performance (often music, but poets, storytellers and the like can also be played), and through their performance thay can generate spells. There are various charts showing how a bard character gains levels and develops as they gaim experience.

Though short - two whole pages of an eight-page PDF are devoted to the Open Game Licence - this gives quite a good overview of the game/setting as a whole, and should let you decide if you want to investigate further. The little bit of world history provided is evocative and sets the scene well for the sort of game envisaged, encapsulating a world that sounds like it will be fun to adventure in. The notes also suggest that it ought to be easy to introduce younger children to this game, always a good thing. Take a look, and if you like the sound, jump right on in!



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Odysseys & Overlords Free Preview
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Thank you SO MUCH for your kind review!
Monster Menagerie: Gruesome Foes Preview
Publisher: Rogue Genius Games
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 05/06/2019 08:16:17

This short preview - designed to promote a Kickstarter campaign for the complete product - begins with an explanation of how to create a 'Gruesome' monster by adding one of the gruesome templates to an existing monster (or, of course, one of your own devising. Each template comes with an example creature, but although certain templates seem suited to particular types of creature, it's suggested that mixing them up a bit can result in interesting and challenging foes. There are also suggestions for how to use the monsters to which you apply that template to best effect and a set 'shock value'.

The 'shock value' is an indicator of the sheer visceral horror induced by meeting the gruesome monster, a real treat for those who want to add a twist of horror to their game. You may be aiming for a horror-themed game anyway, or perhaps you want the shock factor of introducing one such monster at an appropriate place in a more regular game. Either can be an effective use of these templates.

The samples presented are the Bound Horror - which poor beastie is bound to a given location or object (or even an individual) - and the Forgotten - which exist in more than one reality simultaneously and can cause amnesia in those who encounter them. Hopefully you can forget meeting one, 'cos they look quite repulsive and, yes, gruesome!

If you like the look of this, trundle over to the Kickstarter and sign up!



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Monster Menagerie: Gruesome Foes Preview
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Road to Oblivion (3.5)
Publisher: Wizards of the Coast
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 04/19/2019 12:36:59

There has been an earthquake in some remote mountains with all manner of consequences. There's a lenthy background that explains what is going on, setting the scene nicely. The hooks provided have the party in one of two remote townships - the road between them has been blocked by a rockfall, and a cleric going to one of them to take charge of the Temple of Pelor has gone missing. Or of course they might just be travelling that road about their own concerns, and come across the rockfall and what it has revealed...

Be that as it may, the adventure proper starts when the party arrives at the rockfall. From then on, a series of encounters leads them on to explore and discover what was hidden in the hills. There are plenty of opportunities for conversation as well as for some good fights; whilst the party will meet some folks who challege common conceptions - much is not what it seems... and there is also a terrifying monster that must be destroyed.

The descriptions are full of delightful little details that make the place come to life, and what they find is fascinating indeed. However, if you like to tie things down with maps and plans you will have to develop your own - at least an area map could be useful. There are strange and beautiful things to be found in the mountains, enjoy exploring them.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Road to Oblivion (3.5)
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A Harvest of Evil (3.0)
Publisher: Wizards of the Coast
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 04/19/2019 12:32:34

Twin Oaks is a tiny, sleepy little thorp located just within the sheltering eaves of a great forest... so of course something is going to go wrong, something will disturb their peaceful life, and indeed it does. The background for the DM describes just what it is, but as the main antagonist is desperate to avoid notice new arrivals in the settlement do not.

By its very nature, this is a good adventure to drop on the party as they are travelling about their own business. All you need is a suitable small village on the edge of a big forest. On the other hand, if you prefer you may want to use the main antagonist as a recurring figure in an ongoing campaign. Up to you. The hooks supplied cater for both eventualities: pick the one most appropriate to your needs and your players.

There are descriptions of the settlement and the surrounding forest, with maps originally published in the Map-a-Week series on the Wizards of the Coast website (the links still work as of the time of writing, but the versions included in the adventure are just as good). There are notes about what the antagonist is up to, as well as his full statistics for when he is discovered, whilst the house-by-house notes for the settlement provide subtle clues that all is not as it should be, hopefully prompting the party to investigate further. They are quite subtle and you might want to play them up a bit to ensure that the party actually takes notice.

A nice feature is that the antagonist is powerful enough that he might well be able to escape from a party of the suggested level, to remain a thorn in their sides for some time thereafter even if this is their first encounter with him. However, given his nature, there are no options for negotiation - most parties will be eager to destroy him once they realise what is going on...



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
A Harvest of Evil (3.0)
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Star Trek Adventures: Nest in the Dark
Publisher: Modiphius
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 04/18/2019 14:07:26

It's always a bit disconcerting when your warp drive fails. The Synopsis explains what is going on, and what the party will have to do to resolve the situation, and there are notes explaining where to fit this adventure within the timelines of several Star Trek eras, although it's intended to fall in the TNG era of play.

The action begins during a routine trip to check on a lost probe. Just around shift change on the bridge of the party's starship the warp drive fades away and a whole shed-load of alarms go off. Once they have figured out the immediate cause - a massive subspace field - they can then discover some other unnerving problems. They are off-course, and time is acting oddly as well. There's a remarkably strange sight on the viewscreen as well. Figuring all this out is likely to be quite difficult, but some detailed information on likely rolls to discover what's out there are provided and the party ought to get there with a little nudging and the expenditure of some Momentum. There is a wealth of information for the GM to take on board and disseminate as appropriate - this is an adventure that will benefit from some prep time in getting your head around what's going on before you run it!

By the end of the initial investigatory phase, the party should be curious and filled with wonder at finding something hitherto unheard of. They shouldn't feel threatened. To begin with, what they have encountered hasn't even noticed them, and once it does, it's only curious about them. Yet... that disruptive field is only going to cause problems: the anomaly is on course for a Federation outpost! However, when the anomaly gets curious, it starts trying to find out what it has encountered, resulting in a series of puzzles for the party to figure out (once they realise that they are puzzles, that is!). Interestingly, a range of variant puzzles are provided for the GM to choose depending on whether the party is more Command or Science orientated. All are well-supported with suggestions of how to solve them, as well as providing the answers. It's important to understand Extended Tasks for this adventure.

Eventually, the party will meet with an individual, or manifestation, with which they can communicate. Or at least try to... the concepts and background understood by this representative are truly alien, and should prove entertaining (if a bit of a challenge) for the GM to role-play. There's plenty of guidance to help, though, and suggestions as to what can be said and explained. The immediate need is to persuade them to change course, which once the message is got across, they will agree to do so. The adventure concludes with the likely aftermath of this encounter and a few suggestions for further adventures.

This is a very cerebral adventure, which some groups might find dull - others will be entranced and thoroughly enjoy meeting something so unusual and possibly unique. It will need thoughtful GMing to make it work well, but should prove memorable when done well with the right group, capturing the real essence of exploration.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Star Trek Adventures: Nest in the Dark
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Star Trek Adventures: Trouble on Omned III
Publisher: Modiphius
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 04/17/2019 13:51:06

In this adventure, the party's routine science mission (or whatever else you have them embroiled in) is interrupted by orders to head for a planet called Omned III where civil war is about to break out! Living on the fringes of Federation Space, the locals are a human-like species who have achived space travel, indeed the elite in this class-ridden society live on an orbital platform while the 'ordinary' folk remain on the planetary surface. The quarrel is about the failure of a surface-grown cure for a disease endemic to the planet that causes accelerated ageing. Shipments sent to the orbital enclave don't appear to be working, and the elite think it's a deliberate plot to do away with them.

A surface-dweller has contacted the Federation for help, although the elite are not interested in their help. The nature of the adventure is such that it may be played in any era, and Omned III can be located anywhere convenient. Indeed, it would be possible to change the species involved if another one suits your needs better.

As soon as orders come in, the party may research Omned III and the native species (who are called the Shean) in the databases. Their welcome at the orbital facility will depend on how much they reveal of their orders, although they'll get a basically friendly reception whatever they say. Once the matter is aired, the elite are adamant: it's a plot on the part of the surface-dwellers to harm them, and they won't be swayed from their plans to deal with them severely. They will however accept the party's help in studying the afflicted patients, and the 'cure' that they have been sent... but they are reluctant to allow them to make contact with the surface dwellers. The surface-dwellers will, on the other hand, be delighted to welcome them.

There is plenty of information about what makes key players tick, and several ways in which the GM can ramp up threat levels as appropriate both in the orbital station and on the surface. The background to the disease is well-described as is the issue with the 'cure', and it ought to be possible for the party to figure out what the problem is, and to suggest a remedy. Whilst it is entirely possible that the adventure will end in bloodshed, careful science and a measure of diplomacy have a good chance of resolving the situation peacefully. Both outcomes are detailed, and there are suggestions for follow-up adventures.

This is a nicely-constructed adventure that has a real Star Trek feel to it - it's easy to imagine it as an episode in the show. The party's actions will have a lasting effect on Omned III.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Star Trek Adventures: Trouble on Omned III
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John Carter of Mars Core Rulebook
Publisher: Modiphius
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 04/15/2019 13:58:08

Lead developer Jack Norris sums it all up in his foreword: the science-fantasy that is Barsoom is one to capture the imagination and hold on to it; and his delight at getting to play in this world shines through these pages. The presentation reaches out to embrace you too, starting with the sweeping red expanses of the end-paper maps. OK, I prefer portrait orientation books but... it's so lush!

So on to Chapter 1: Welcome to Barsoom. If you have so far got through life without visiting, here's your chance to discover what you have missed. It begins with some notes on the author, Edgar Rice Burroughs, and on the science-fantasy planetary romance stories he wrote. Whilst maybe best remembered for having invented Tarzan, John Carter of Mars is a much more rounded character with hidden depths - both in Carter and in the stories themselves - that rise above the whole 'pulp' genre they ostensibly belong to. Noteworthy in this setting: there isn't any 'evil'... just danger and excitement, people with differing objectives, dangerous animals and so on to contend with. There's a brief glossary covering common terms and then we turn to the pragmatic: what you need to play the game and what this role-playing is all about anyway. The three different eras in which you can play are outlined briefly, too.

Next is Section 1, which contains a couple of chapters that take you through creating a character. If you are already familiar with the Modiphius house system, 2d20 or 'Momentum', it's all pretty easy, but even if it is completely newto you, everything is explained clearly. The idea is to create wholly-original characters, but if you want to play the ones from the books, they are presented later on. Characters are created using a nine-step process, beginning with the grand concept of who that character actually is, the undelying basic concept that makes them tick. Next give them some attributes which, unlike many games, are abstract and rather results-orientated rather than specifying physical and mental capabilities. So we have Cunning, Daring, Empathy, Might, Passion, and Reason. Next you choose race: there are several different Martian races as well as Earth humans (who are very unusual) to pick from. Each Martian race is defined by colour, they are fairly homogeneous and serve to provide basic background knowledge and skills. That sorted, you need an Archetype - this is basically what the character does for a living (or did) and allows for a lot of customisation. Each one provides suggestions as to what the character knows and can do; and one or more appropriate Talents are suggested for them. There are all manner of Archetypes: assassins, mercenaries, explorers, envoys, healers, rogues... and if none suits there are notes about creating your own. An interesting feature of this system is that you don't have 'skills' - competency is assumed in the things you know how to do. Now the fun starts. You need a Descriptor. Characters in this game are larger-than-life, dramatic personalities and you pick a word that describes how they approach life - bold, perhaps reckless, courageous or dashing... This has a mechanical effect, in terms of bonuses to appropriate attributes. This is followed by choosing Talents, starting renown and equipment, and a flaw. Finally, you'll need a name, and there are suggestions for how different races assign names.

To aid you, there's a detailed walkthrough of character generation following the description of it, and then some sample characters. Each is presented in quite generic, yet detailed terms. If you're in a hurry, all you need do is slap a name and a few background details on and you could play a 'Stalwart Red Martian Duelist' or a 'Thoughtful Green Martian Guide' or whichever takes your fancy. A separate chapter covers Talents, going into quite a lot of detail as they are pivotal to how a character works. Talents are more than skills or learned abilities. In a game where hypercompetency is assumed, if your background suggests that you can do a thing - or someone has taught you how - you can do that thing... even if it is as complex as flying an airship. Talents are the things that make the character stand out, they can not only do that thing, but do it with style and better than most anyone else. Mechanically, you bring a Talent into play when attempting an action for which that Talent is appropriate.

OK, now you've got a character. Section 2 covers all you need to know to play them to best effect, beginning with Chapter 4: Adventuring in Barsoom, a chapter which explains the basic rules for playing the game. It explains the custom Combat Dice (and how to use a regular d6 if you don't happen to have the special ones), and how task resolution works. It sounds more complex than it is, so try out a few rolls in advance of the game to get the hang of it all. Note that this is for both Narrators and players, and includes all the behind the scenes calculations the Narrator has to do in setting difficulty, etc. It covers Momentum and Threat as well, specialist mechanics that allow player-characters to capitalise on their success - and the Narrator to make things more 'interesting' for them. There is also detailed information on Action Scenes - typically combat - when turn-by-turn tactical play is required. It ends with Damage and Recovery, and Luck. Luck reflects the fact that the Player-Characters are a cut above ordinary people, and gives them a small mechanical advantage - points to spend on die rolls or to influence the story. They are earned back by good role-play.

Next comes Chapter 5: Weapons, Technology and Equipment. There's a selection of weapons, a description of the appearance and significance of the traditional Martian 'harness' (they hate clothes, apparently), and a range of equipment for various purposes. In line with the heroic style, it's generally assumed that a character has whatever they need, unless its absence is part of the plot. The technology chiefly covers the forms of transport unique to Barsoom, but also covers biological science. The last chapter in this section is Chapter 6: Growing your Legend which covers experience, character development and the acquisition of Renown. This is the measure of a character's social and political position, their fame in the community, something vitally important and which can be used to gain accolades or titles.

We then move on to the setting, Barsoom itself, in Section 3, with chapters covering the history of Barsoom and looking at the societies of the various colours of Martian. There's a heady mix of biology, geography and everyday life - religion, social behaviour, warrior customs, slavery, clothing, food and drink (sadly it sounds rather dull), and more. Entertainment, crime, technology, architechture, it's all there. A note is added that the game background reflects that of the Burrough's stories, with things like slavery and gender-designated roles which some modern players may find objectionable. They can always make changes to suit their sensibilities. A chapter on The Green Hordes covers the most common species of Martian, the Green Martians, then The Red Kingdoms does the same for Red Martians (including loads of detail about their cities) and the next chapter in this section looks at the rest of the planet, primarily the northern ice cap, which is a lot more lively than you might think. Finally, the rest of the Solar System is covered in Beyond Barsoom.

Section 5 is Narrator territory, with advice on running the game, a bestiary, a chapter on the secrets of Barsoom and a collection of Champions of Barsoom (this is where you look if you want to play John Carter or Dejah Thoris themselves), loads of interesting and powerful folk for the party to meet and interact with. The advice is sound, much of it applicable to GMing any game, and other bits appropriate to this game in particular (or at least, the sort of sweeping science-fantasy feel this game aims to achieve). There are snippets about using the game mechanics to best effect, and ways to utilise the style of the original stories and their conventions in your game... and how to expand upon the 'known world' in a fitting manner.

The creatures in the bestiary all come with descriptions and even plot seeds involving them, and many are illustrated. There are notes for designing your own beasties too. I'll not talk about the Secrets of Barsoom here: suffice to say there are a good few plot ideas therein! Strange places to explore, too. Chapter 16: Mind Merchants of Mars is a full-blown introductory adventure which opens with the party fighting in an arena as slaves - they'll get a chance to find out how they got there after the fight is over! Then they will probably start to plot their escape... but of course, nothing is plain sailing. Assuming they survive, the next chapter is jam-packed with ideas for further adventures. Plenty there to fill many a gaming session with adventure.

This game captures the epic, planetary romance feel of the original stories well. If you enjoyed them, you will relish the chance to live in Barsoom yourself. If you've never read them, there's sufficient here to get you going (and probably inspire you to track the books down as well). Definately a fun addition to your game collection, perfect for when you need a well-constructed, exciting yet light-hearted game.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
John Carter of Mars Core Rulebook
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Random Starship Name Generator
Publisher: Rogue Genius Games
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 03/30/2019 15:10:07

There's a lot packed into this four-page book, expecially when you consider one page is onr of Blackmon's glorious full-colour is a bit cartoon-y illustrations of a ship out in the black.

Next comes a word list. Roll 1d100 and pick a first name, then roll another on a second column to get the rest of the name. (Rummages for dice)... OK, we shall take to the skies in the Capella Rocket. Then the fun starts. Why was it called that? Maybe it was the previous owners, and we all know it's bad luck to change a ship's name, right?

But there's more! Another table (roll 3d6 twice) to find out what the type and colour of that strange-looking weapon you just found. Anyone want a weapon that emits line of discs that are gold in colour? No, I don't know what it does either. Heck, it may not even be street-legal here.

Tiny but really useful resource, especially if your mind goes black when the party ask what the third ship over at the space dock is called!



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Random Starship Name Generator
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