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Blade and Lockpick. A game engine for solo and two player games
by Bryan B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/09/2018 17:17:06

For what it is, and what it is supposed to do, this system is perfect. It is rules-light, fast, and easy. It is fairly granular, so there isn't a wide range for variation; however, in the way that I have tended to use it, it does its job beautifully.

This is an excerpt from an email I sent to the designer, which I realized would work well as a review, so I pasted it in here:

So I got the PDF a while back from RPGNow, read it, and found it fairly interesting. I actually know the crew that created Tunnels & Trolls, so the reference to it (and the way you handled the "all or nothing" of combat, as you mention) was pretty interesting to me.

However, I hadn't really used the system.

I've got three campaigns theoretically going, but haven't really enjoyed running any of them, so when some friends were coming over and mentioned gaming, I decided to run a fantasy game set in my own world, and wanted a simple system, since they can have difficulty mastering new systems, and even 5th edition D&D, which I like a lot, was more complex than I wanted for a possible one-shot.

I chose B&L, and have really enjoyed it, as have the players.

The system is simple enough to be easy to pick up and keep up with, and while on the face of it, the available options are limited, this allows the players and GM to "write" the characters and situations as they wish. No nit-picking of options or lists of choices to make, no restrictions on what race or class to choose from, and this allows the players and GM to "write" the characters and situations as they wish, something I've sometimes seen more specifically detailed systems give people trouble with. Just decide who and what your character is and get going. I was able to whip up four sample characters in a few minutes, and make all of them interesting enough to appeal to the characters.

Play has been fast and easy, and the players all understood what to do, remembered what to do, and figured out how to use their characters' various traits and skills to their advantage very quickly ("I'm a soldier, I probably know where to find a good tavern.")

All of this has really contributed to my appreciation for the system, though I do sometimes wish it was slightly less granular, as there isn't a lot of room for nuance. But at those times, I try to remember that what a foe is like is up to how to describe it to the players, not what its stats say, or whatever.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Blade and Lockpick. A game engine for solo and two player games
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Five Parsecs From Home
by Fabian K. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/01/2018 11:03:54

[Please note that english is not my first language.] Five Parsecs From Home (FPFH) is not the first solo-wargame I've bought on wargamevault. But it is the first solo-wargame I played extensively.

0.) THE GIST You put a crew of more or less renegade space-adventures against a variety of foe. Inteded for (quick) solo-play.

1.) PRESENTATION Currently clocking it at 56 pages, the booklets layout is simple, yet effective. It is clearly meant to be printed out on half-letter/A5. Printing is a thing I can clearly recommend as it contains tons of tables which need to be referenced often. I should note: Tables are NOT used during combat! Only during the Campaign Turn (see below). It uses pictures sparingly - mostly "action" shots of sci-fi wargaming. Color is used to layout the tables (grey/yellow). Other then that, keywords are bold.

2.) FLUFF There is no "Five Parsecs"-Setting, though the influences are clear and stated by the author: Traveller, Trigun, Mass Effect, Firefly, and Borderlands. While there's no official background, the random tables give you a good feeling about the intent of the author, something often called "implied setting". For example, your crews ship can be a "Battered Mining Ship", your patron may be the "Local Authorities", your enemies might be "Isolationists" or "Mutants". All in all, enough to get your creative juices flowing if you want to add some story-depth to your fights.

3.) CREW/CHARACTER CREATION At first, you generate your crew of five. Characters are defined by four (five) stats - Reactions (Initiative), Speed (simple, in tabletop-inches), Combat Skill, and Toughness. The fifth skill, Tech is not really used in FPFH but will be needed if you want to mix the game up with other titles of the range. Abilities are increased via XP (and sometimes decreased via injuries), some items give flat bonuses to them, too. I won't go into detail, but let's say the following: While Speed-increases might be of obvious (minor) use, Reactions and Combat Skill are really powerful. Toughnes directly reduces your chance to get hurt, so it will be of use, too (1/6 chance per point). Since your character is generated randomly - Background, Motivation and Character Class are all rolled up randomly on beautiful designed random tables - you don't have too much influence on the results. All three instances give you a random assortment of Enemies, Patrons, Credits, Gear/Gadgets and increases on your Abilities. In addition to the items gained by character creation, you gain an assortment of gear that goes straight to your stash. Before your mission, you will need to allocate your equipment.

4.) WEAPONS/GEAR/GADGETS There are enough weapons to satisfy your crunchy needs. Weapons are grouped into Low-Tech, Military and Hi-Tech Weapons and, you guessed right, are determined at random. So your 1d100 roll can give you a lousy hand gun (12" range/1 shot/0 damage) or a mighty shotgun (12" range/2 shots/1 damage). As you can see, weapon range is used, a little bit more on that later. Shots shows you, how many attack dice you roll, sometimes (as with the shotgun) this is "Focused", meaning, you can only shoot at one target. Damage means a flat bonus to your Damage roll. Some Items are of single/limited use (e. g. Frakk Grenades come in a pack of three). Other then that there is a plethora of various Doodads, some very powerful (Combat Armor for example gives you a flat +1 Toughness and Reactions), other more casual (Loaded Dice give you +1d6 credits/turn but you'll lose them and get injured when you roll a 6). You'll find this throughout the book: Pleasure and pain go hand in hand, sometimes to a borderline frustrating degree).

5.) ENCOUNTERS Essentially there are 2 stages - the Campaign Turn and Encounters. The Campaign Turn can be played with just a pencil, paper and some dice. Essentially you'll manage your crew, next mission, patrons, enemies, experience, everything. This turn is really fun! Even if you don't have the time to put your minis on the table, you can create a crew and play up to the first encounter and have an hour or two full of fun with a simulation game. The Encounter is where the bullets fly. There are different types of encounters: Those given to you by patrons (earns you more money and sometimes patron-benefits), Enemy Encounters (which use predefined enemy-types and are generally not as profitable), Opportunity Missions (as with Patrons sans the bonus) and Quests (more of everything, harder to get). Once you get enemies, you'll sooner or later fight against them. Most often they will be reoccuring "Vendettas", so you'll have to develop a tactic how to defeat them. If you have no Enemies and Patrons and have no luck with Quests, you'll go on an Opportunity mission. Enemies use the same stats and weapons as you and come in all colors. You encounter 2d6h enemies (highest result of two rolled d6), modified by enemy-type. One enemy will be the leader (better weapon, +1 Combat Skill, the others will be foot-soldiers). Having fought six fights now, I can say: Enemy power varies widely, fitting snugly in the whole random-concept of the game. Example? You could roll "well" and fight against three punks (4"/0/3 - equipped with handguns), or you could fight against 6 black-ops (6"/+2/5 - equipped with auto-rifles and a leader with a fury rifle).

6.) RULES The rules are simple. Simple, yet quite brilliant. The best thing (in the current revision of the rules) IMHO is the initiative: You roll a number of d6 equal to your count of crew members. You then assign a d6 result to each member. If the corresponding die is equal or less to the characters Reactions ability, this character acts before the enemies' turn. All other characters act after the enemy. There is a "Guard" action called snapfire, which allows you to deliberately act later or as a reaction to enemy movement. This rule is simple, yet effective. Note that since your Reactions score is pretty low, most of your characters will act after the enemy. Shooting is allowed after movement, except with heavy weapons. A simple d6 roll (one for each shot of your weapon), a result equal or higher then 3/5/6 (depending on distance to the enemy and the grade of cover) is needed to hit the target. Here your Combat Skill is added. Damage is another die roll - you'll add your damage score, if any. If it comes up equal or higher then the enemies Toughness, it is taken out. Lower result means the enemie gets a Stun token, which may be reduced 1/turn, reducing you to movement OR attacking with each activation. If you move into contact with the enemy, you'll brawl. Brawling is a contested d6 roll, Combat Skill is added, there's a -1 penalty for not wealding a melee weapon/pistol or a +1 bonus for wealding melee weapons. The loser takes a hit, on a draw, both takes hits. Also: On a 1, you take an extra hit, on a 6 you'll inflict an extra hit. Damage is determined by best pistol/melee weapon/set to zero if none of both are used. As you can imagine, melee is pretty brutal! Well, this is it. Pretty much. There are more rules of course, but you'll have to buy the book for this :-)

7.) TERRAIN Terrain rules are pretty simple, too. Essentially you have a variety of terrain (Linear, Area, Field, Obstacle, Block, Individual), each with minor rules involved. There is no rule where to place what, but each Encounter gives you a Encounter site as a hint to what kind of terrain to place.

8.) THE A.I. As a solo-gamer you'll need to know how to handle the enemies. Of course you'll have a bias towards your little spaceship-crew, so it's good when there are rules how your enemies behave. FPFH deals with this with general movement routines: Each enemy is either Cautions, Aggressive, Tactical or Psycho. Example? Cautious enemies always stay behind cover if possible. When there's an enemy in sight, they will stand where they are and fire. Otherwise they will move behind cover, trying to establish a line of sight to an enemy. They will stay as far away as their weapons allow and won't deliberately advance nearer then 12". They won't enter a brawl. Does this description cover everything? Certainly not. Would it be nice if there would be more advice? A clear yes. So far I did not encounter a real problem, though. The fights were entertaining and if I'd would like more information on how to handle the enemies, it would have been possible without a hassle. Let's roll up an example patron encounter: Patron: Local gang. Job type: Patrol location. Mission target: Someone's turf. Enemy: Bounty hunters (tactical). Hah! That's easy: Your crew has to patrol the gangs home turf because they expect a group of bounty hunters to hi-jack them. Of course this leads to further questions, but hey: You'll need some imagination and some impromptu decisions to make this work.

9.) OTHER STUFF There are tons of other things in these pages: Optional rules en masse, including difficulty levels, oddball characters, rules for competititve (classic PvP) play and much more.

10.) CONCLUSION I did not really plan to do solo-wargaming. I started buying various sets of rpg and wargaming rules with a mild rules-fetish. The more I bought, the more I expected of them, effectively building a big hurdle to start gaming at all. Then came FPFH. This game seemed so easy to start with! I built some quick terrain with Duplos/Legos, some minis with Legos and started playing. This game delivers what it promises: Easy, fun and extendable solo-wargaming. If I needed to rate this product, I'd give it a flat 5/5.

BUY THIS, IF... ...you like wargaming at all ...you like sci-fi random tables ...you are interested in a good designed rules-set ...you are interested in a simple AI to handle opposition in solo-gaming

DON'T BUY THIS, IF... I have no really good idea. If you really hate procedural content, this won't be the game for you.

Hope, this'll help someone! F.Khalil

P.S.: Ivan Sorenson, the author, is very active at G+. He is a terribly nice guy and he will most certainly react if you contact him.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Five Parsecs From Home
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LaserStorm. 6mm grand warfare.
by warren w. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/17/2018 07:00:22

I am very happy with LaserStorm Sci-fi rules. I have found all the features mentioned in the rules overview are correct and the rules achieve the desired effect. I have tried numerous rules ranging from ok to good, and I believe for me, that this set of rules may be the one because it hits so many buttons for me. I like the no counters, the unique save concept, the unit activation cards....on and on.

I have 6mm figures (Space Marines and Orge) that I will use these rules for eventually. I also have 15mm figures (Hammers and Halo) that I will try as well. I have started with my very large and diverse 28mm collections and the initial two games were good using a red verse blue set of figures that I use for all rules I am trying out. I believe this rule set offers a nice game for either solo, as I am playing them, or large group battles. In a large battle setting, like how we do bolt action on large scale, I will be organizing each participant to have 3 battle forces, and be paired off with an opponent. Then as I draw the cards, the game flow will be similar to my solo adventure which has proven to be decisive, fun, and quick paced.

Laserstorm - nicely done. Thanks. Bart



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
LaserStorm. 6mm grand warfare.
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Trench Hammer. WW1 fighting on the cheap
by Manning R. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/27/2018 01:49:15

Great game have gotten local players into weirdwar1 using these rules and abit of imagination



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Trench Hammer. WW1 fighting on the cheap
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FiveCore Retro Collection
by Philippe D. F. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/26/2018 18:31:41

I really loved what I have found in this bundle: a full game, perfect for skirmishes, where each soldier is not a list of stats with numbers attached to each. In fact most soldiers don't have stats, they have a weapon and it's enough for what they are supposed to do. Rules use 1D6 and definitely aim at being quickly playable. On each case (hit, spot etc) only rolls of 1 or 6 will indicate an important effect on figures.

But it is not a simplistic game either, there is everything one expect to find in such a game. The trick is that the author is able to explain complivated things clearly and efficiently. Many games claim to be easy to learn but this one really is. There is the basic rulebook and each other file is a choke-full of details on one aspect of skirmishes. that way to write is really efficient because the basic rulebook is 32-page long only and makes a good apethizer for further rules needs on this subject or another.

I think that I have found a complete, detailed but manageable set of rules in a skirmish games universe where people mostly take too much time giving relevance to details. Here, if you are not about details or rules lawyering, you may not even need the additional data about character's skills, wounds levels, or partisans equipments to name only a few within dozens of detailed, separate chapters in the extensions.

When I am going to play again firearms-like skirmishes I will use these rules. A beautifully engineered little gem of a game.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
FiveCore Retro Collection
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FiveCore Company Command
by Pat C. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 01/26/2018 22:16:43

I like FiveCore Company Commander. I like it a LOT.

The "fire for effect" mechanic which is also used in Five Core Brigade commander is very different than many wargames.

You roll "kill dice" and "shock dice" in combat. The better your unit, the more dice you throw. The results can remove the stand from play, or degrade it's ability to move and fire or paralyze it. Retreats are also possible.

There are many different troop types, they have different shock and kill dice in combat. They also have assualt bonus (or penalty) and some have unique aspects that model their real world behavior.

Tanks are handled as "similar, better, worse, hopeless" in term of technology difference. People who like to count mm or armor and such may not like this approach. BUT it does reflect how real commanders think, and more importantly how a commander would fight his unit.

The last pages of the rules are devoted to creating scenarios, campaign generation, and other variations.

Command and Control are represented by giving the commander "points" that he can use to activate stands. This allows them to move and fire. Stands that are close enough can do a group move. There is a group fire also.

This has become my "first choice" for playing at this scale. While the rules are clearly meant and designed for smaller actions (small table, 10-15 stand per side) I have used it on a much larger table, with more stands per side. It works very well.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
FiveCore Company Command
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FiveCore Brigade Commander
by Pat C. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 01/26/2018 22:00:37

I have mixed feelings about FiveCore Brigade Commander.

In many ways, I like it a LOT. The "fire for effect" mechanic which is also used in Five Core Company commander is very different than many wargames.

You roll "kill dice" and "shock dice" in combat. The better your unit, the more dice you throw. The results can remove the stand from play, or degrade it's ability to move and fire or paralyze it. Retreats are also possible.

There are many different troop types, and these,in my opinion, model reaistically their real world behavior.

Tanks are handled as "similar, better, worse, hopeless" in term of technology difference. People who like to count mm or armor and such may not like this approach. BUT it does reflect how real commanders think, and more importantly how a commander would fight his unit.

About half the rules are devoted to creating scenarios, campaign generation, and other variations.

I think what I dislike is that morale is built into the fire combat shock and dice rolls. I also dislike the HQ is essentially nothing but a target.

However, I DO like the 5 Core Company Commander a LOT. It is very similar to Brigade Commander.

I am not at all sorry I purchased it, and likely will play it again.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
FiveCore Brigade Commander
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October Hammer. RCW gaming on the cheap!
by Daniel A. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 01/18/2018 20:40:03

I played a solo game tonight to figure out the rules. Very easy to pick up and fast paced. It took around an hour and a half to play through 6 turns (rear guard scenario from Trench Hammer using Friekorps vs Balkan Nationalists) with a bit of paging through the rules. It seems like it will be very easy to scale up from the 4 units per side that I used - going to give this another try soon with some more troops and players but so far I'm impressed.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
October Hammer. RCW gaming on the cheap!
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Trench Hammer. WW1 fighting on the cheap
by Tamás L. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 01/06/2018 11:49:29

I purchased the rules after they were released as I wanted to have a WW1 game that did not require 100+ infantrymen for a standard battle (khm, WH:tGW), and this seemed to fit the bill. While I haven't played with other Nordic Weasel Games so far, but read rather good things about them, I was looking at these rules with high hopes, and they paid came true for the most part.

The game gives a quick and relatively hasslefree game for playing WW1 clashes between the forces of WW1 with mostly every troop type covered in the rulebook bar for some that would be really out of place (like heavy artillery). The special rules associated with them are logical and as far as my somewhat limited knowledge of WW1 go, accurate. However the rules are mostly aimed for the Beer and Pretzel type of players, as it was mentioned in the introduction, but there are indications of it throughout the book. Some rules are not crystal clear, but with applying the group's preferences, can be easily solved. Also, while we're at it, it's houserule friendly, as these rules are not overcomplicated - thus if you want to modify something, do it, it won't break the game or anything.

Overall we had a fun time playing the game, the 4/5 because of the moot nature of some rules. This ruleset will stay as my preferred WW1 ruleset for a while I think, with the scenarios described in the TFL expansion books.

Hopefully there will be some expansions with scenarios whether historical or just a random generator - knowing NWG and their products, the later could be likely, and will be good, especially if paired with a random force generator as well.

Well, what more can be said that at 5$ it's a really great value for gaming WW1 on a budget. Grab some Caesar and Revell Germans (if you can), some HaT heavy weapons, a box of HaT Canadians, and you have all the figures you might need for Trench Hammer.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Trench Hammer. WW1 fighting on the cheap
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Blade and Lockpick. A game engine for solo and two player games
by Ian R. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 12/12/2017 11:32:32

The dice pool system is interesting and I can see the potential in the core mechanics. They resolve in an interesting manner although I do regret the choice to use 1 die per skilled character, simply because it leads to more reaching than I enjoy just to have moderate odds of success.

Even the example of the thief picking a lock and "This character had crafted a fancy set of lockpicks in the past so he was assisting" isn't my idea of narratively important and it's drags the speed of the game down a bit.

Complaint aside, it's easy to house rouse and enjoy the pooling.

As for solo play, it contains a few random tables for mythic style gaming, but I can't see myself using these tables over what I already have. Besides, I didn't find this style of play particularly engaging and this won't be dethroning any of my current favorites.

At the end of the day I can't say I'm satisfied with the purchase. The price was too high for it's contents. It's worth a picking up for the dice pool mechanics, but I'd recommend waiting for a sale.



Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Blade and Lockpick. A game engine for solo and two player games
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Creator Reply:
Cheers! I am sorry you didn't feel satisfied but I appreciate you sharing your thoughts. Relying on multiple characters was intended as a way to let more than one character be included in a scene. As you suggest, its easy enough to house rule that, if you prefer avoiding that or feel it is too much of a reach. Best wishes! Ivan
Five Parsecs From Home
by Bozz C. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 11/23/2017 12:34:47

Five Parsecs From Home 2nd Edition

My first reaction to the email telling me about the new Five Parsecs game was excitement. Yes! A new Weasel title and an update that I'd been eagerly awaiting! I jumped straight on wargamevault.com to download the update but curiously it seemed to want me to pay full price for it, I was confused as updates to other games have been included in the original purchase price. I was also slightly annoyed because Five Parsecs went to Pay What You Want a day or two after I'd bought it and the thought of paying for it again was unpleasant. I emailed Ivan and he very kindly offered me a copy in exchange for an honest review, this it it.

What I can say now having read the new edition is that having to pay for the game is fully justified. This is a brand new system! I know it says so in the product description but this really is a whole new system that bears little resemblance to the original FiveCore-based rules. What follows are my initial impressions from a few complete read-throughs.

Let's start with the “Not So Good” stuff. I use the term loosely as most things are probably either errors or oversights and of course my own personal opinions.

Firstly, there are some spelling and grammar errors. Not the end of the world, I know, but I'm a stickler for these things and I feel they can really bring down the professional feel of an otherwise awesome document. Unfortunately, this is something I continually notice with independently produced games.

Ivan makes no bones about the fact that the page count had been heavily cut and for good reason, but I am left wondering if there is now something missing. At 43 pages, it's definitely lean and mean but there a few things I'd have liked to see left in. The fluff at the beginning of the first edition document was fun, well-written and linked the game into the Unity universe. Also, the Enemy Missions from first edition were a lot of fun and very thematic. Personally, although in general I very much approve of the massive page cut, I think 50 pages would've been fine.

There are a few errors and contradictions within the rules. They are being weeded out and dealt with though with Ivan's usual responsiveness to emails. The Non-Lethal Hit has a conflict regarding whether one has to equal or exceed toughness to score a casualty, the Campaign Reference sheet at the end of The Campaign Turn chapter is still missing multiple steps (Playing an Encounter, Campaign Event and Character Event) and the Find a Patron section of that sheet could have used an extra line to remind us of the +1 for each known patron rule. Such oversights are easily fixed and I'm sure they will be in the future.

Finally, something that is more a personal nitpicking. The Friends and Rivals mechanic has been pruned back, it used to be a really cool, and easy to track, roleplay mechanic with in-game effects. Although it would have had to have been tweaked to work with the new system I was sad to see it largely dropped.

Right. I wanted to get that done so the review could finish on the “Good” stuff. Now, where to start?

I think the best aspect of 2nd edition is the character creation and advancement system. I feel that it's a much more realised system than in 1st edition and it really lets you invest in your characters. Speaking of investing, the new economic system is something that I personally have been hoping for. For me it just adds so much more realism to my campaign than just the “It is assumed you have have the odds and ends you need to trade” of 1st edition. I actually tried to use the Fistful of Credits system from Starport Scum in my Five Parsecs games but this tailored mechanic is much better suited.

The new tabletop mechanics sound the business too. The Turn Phases with the integrated Snap Fire option are easy to get a handle on and add a level of randomness to the battlefield. The Difficult Terrain rules are simple and a good example of pruning superfluity. The Aim option is a welcome addition too, especially as you can't shoot then move, sacrificing your move for a better chance at a kill is a good trade-off in my opinion.

I was impressed to see that Difficulty Settings actually had several different options instead of the standard Easier or Harder modes. Including the Standard setting there are 6(!) levels of difficulty to play, guaranteeing the right level of challenge for almost everyone. I wouldn't mind seeing a future supplement that applied higher and lower difficulty settings for the rest of the campaign turn too.

One of my gripes with 1st edition was that I didn't really understand how one went about resolving rumours. 2nd edition has fixed this completely. I also enjoyed the inclusion of the Oddball Characters, although I missed who the crystalline life form was referring too. My own gaming universe contains aliens and it seems like I can slot most of them in to the different oddball slots.

One of the questions I had during my first read-through was “Is it compatible with Every Star An Opportunity?” In my opinion, yes! I've re-read Every Star and as it's mainly about expanding your playing world with little in-game (ie. actual tabletop encounter) effect, I still think that players who want to add a bit more depth to their characters' universe will benefit from the expansion. My favourite part of Every Star is the Starship Events chart and I think it'll lend itself well to 2nd edition with a few tweaks. Which reminds me, I'm glad to be shot of the Unreliable mechanic. If you rolled like I do, you'd understand!

So to wrap up, Five Parsecs From Home 2nd edition is an awesome game. I'm a big fan of everything sci-fi in Ivan's lineup and this is definitely no exception. It's a brand new system that will undoubtedly need a few updates over the course of its life, as most of them do, and it's a damn fine resource for solo gamers! I'll be playing a few games over the weekend and writing up an AAR, so watch this space for that.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Five Parsecs From Home
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Blade and Lockpick. A game engine for solo and two player games
by Dillard R. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 11/16/2017 00:44:10

Bottom line up front (BLUF): 6 USD is entirely too high a price for what you get. The group mechanics for overcoming challenges is interesting and looks like it could be really effective for narrative style gaming. This is a very lite set of rules. The author frequently points out that it can be used with other systems. Use the oracle with your favorite system to use those rules while running solo or use the mechanics in place of the rules of your aforementioned favorite setting. In other words this is just a quick set of rules to run your favorite game/setting using other mechanics and... There are some quick tables for jumping into a randomly generated setting. FATE does that better. The oracle could be easily replaced by Mythic or any other solo system out there (the oracle is very basic). The only really original (at least to me) bit is the dice pool system for overcoming challenges.

The book lacks art. It has few (and basic) examples. There are no pre-generated PCs or settings. The page layout wastes a lot of space. I imagine the book could have been done in half the pages.

I have a soft spot for solo games. This one presented one unique (and effective) idea for running challenges. The rest of the rules are done better elsewhere. So for just the unique group creation/rules in a solo setting it deserves a 3 star rating. If there were more to these rules it might be worth 6 dollars, right now I couldn't recommend more than 1 or 2 dollars at most.



Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Blade and Lockpick. A game engine for solo and two player games
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Creator Reply:
Cheers and appreciate the review! We will definitely add more examples and some pre-generated player characters. Appreciate the feedback. Not adding art was deliberate for print-friendliness but we'll take the feedback into account for the future.
Blade and Lockpick. A game engine for solo and two player games
by sean m. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 11/10/2017 22:21:34

Buy if interested in Solo gaming.Reading made me want to try out the dice mechanics before I had even finished the book , definately going to use the Combat/Challenge system in some way in my own Solo games.I do like all of Nordic Weasel's games that I have bought,great company that caters well to the solo rpg market.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Blade and Lockpick. A game engine for solo and two player games
by Quarty M. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 11/10/2017 03:01:14

This is a great lite system that does exactly what it says on the tin.

I found the solo mechanics quick, easy and could create fun situations on the fly:

Within minutes of looking at the solo tables I had my charming duelist and his theatrical mage mistress overhearing a plot to depose the city ruler by the head priest (after almost being caught in a delicate position in the Sun Temple).

The combat and challenge system is streamlined and fast. Yet brilliant enoughtl to handle fighting minions, big bads, environment problems like climbing walls or bluffing guards.

In short, fast simple mechanics with a fun character creation system. A steal at this price.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Dungeon Scum
by Customer Name Withheld [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/29/2017 19:16:51

Quite a nice system. Neat mechanics I haven't seen elsewhere, quck to learn, and I like the way it handles schools of magic. The production values are purely amatuer hour in terms of layout, copyediting, etc. (hence the four- instead of five-star rating), but there's enough to like about this ruleset to make me glad I bought it anyway. I work in publishing, and I'm almost tempted to offer my services to clean it up and give it a more proper release. There could be a real audience for this cool wargame-RPG hybrid system if published with more care.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Dungeon Scum
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